Alfred Marshall

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Marshall, A (1842.7.26-1924.7.13)
Birthplace London, England.
Posts Held
Fellow, St John's Coll. Camb., 1865-77, 1885-1908; Principal, Univ. Coll., Bristol, 1877-82; Lect., Fellow, Balliol Coll. Oxford, 1883-4; Prof. Polit. Econ., Univ. Camb., 1885-1908.
Offices and Honours
Fellow, BA; Vice-Pres., Royal Economic Society.

Publications
Books:
1. The Principles of Economics (1890), Book One - Preliminary Survey.
2. The Principles of Economics (1890), Book Two - Some Fundamental Notions.
3. The Principles of Economics (1890), Book Three - Of Wants and Their Satisfaction.
4. Book Principles of Economics, Book Four: The Agents of Production.
5. The Principles of Economics (1890), Book Five - General Relations of Demand, Supply and Value.
6. The Principles of Economics, Book Six: The Distribution of the National Income

CAREER
Alfred Marshall was born in Bermondsey, a London suburb, on 26 July 1842. He died at Balliol Croft, his Cambridge home of many years, on 13 July 1924 at the age of 81. Professor of Political Economy at the University of Cambridge from 1885 to 1908, he was the founder of the Cambridge School of Economics which rose to great eminence in the 1920s and 1930s: A.C. Pigou and J.M. Keynes, the most important figures in this development, were among his pupils. Marshall's magnum opus, the Principles of Economics was published in 1890 and went through eight editions in his lifetime. It was the most influential treatise of its era and was for many years the Bible of British economics, introducing many still-familiar concepts. Alfred Marshall is one of the most outstanding figures in the development of contemporary economics and his influence has been enormous. His most famous student, J. M. Keynes, wrote that;

‘He was, within his own field, the greatest in the world for a hundred years’.

The dominant figure in British economics of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, who’s Principles ... still, has the power to fascinate and excite the reader. Though he wrote infrequently, his teaching at Cambridge was a major source of influence on his contemporaries. An able mathematician, he sought to express himself in the simplest lan...

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...ion of Marshall's Principles of Economics (socsci.mcmaster.ca) Economic Journal, volume 1, 1891, pp. 611-17
F. Y. Edgeworth, Review of the Second Edition of Marshall's Principles of Economics (unimelb.edu.au) Economic Journal, volume 1, 1891, pp. 611-17
F. Y. Edgeworth, Review of the Third Edition of Marshall's Principles of Economics (socsci.mcmaster.ca) The Economic Journal, volume 5, 1895, pp. 585-9.
F. Y. Edgeworth, Review of the Third Edition of Marshall's Principles of Economics (unimelb.edu.au) The Economic Journal, volume 5, 1895, pp. 585-9.
A. C. Pigou, Review of the Fifth Edition of Mashall's Principles of Economics (socsci.mcmaster.ca) The Economic Journal, volume 17, 1907, pp. 532-5
A. C. Pigou, Review of the Fifth Edition of Mashall's Principles of Economics (unimelb.edu.au) The Economic Journal, volume 17, 1907, pp. 532-5

Reference Sites: http://www.cce.unifi.it/rivista/welcome.htm http://www.ecn.bris.ac.uk/het/marshall/prin/prinbk1 http://www.melbecon.unimelb.edu.au/het/marshall/prin/prinbk1 http://www.socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca/~econ/ugcm/3ll3/marshall/prin/prinbk2 http://www.ecn.bris.ac.uk/het/marshall/prin/prinbk2 http://www.cce.unifi.it/rivista/life.htm
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