Alfalfa Harvesting System

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3. Results and discussion
3.1. Analysis of input-output energy use in different alfalfa harvesting systems
Table 3 shows the inputs and output in different alfalfa harvesting systems. The results indicated diesel fuel and human labor for alfalfa silage production was lower than alfalfa hay production, but the machinery was higher. As it can be seen in table 3 output was determined as 6865.28 Kg ha-1 for alfalfa silage production which more than alfalfa hay production (5721.07 Kg ha-1). Differences in alfalfa yields were related to different cutting in different harvesting systems.
Table 4 displays the energy values for inputs and output in different alfalfa harvesting systems. The total energy requirements for producing the alfalfa hay and alfalfa silage crops in the year were 25922.94 MJ ha-1 and 26821.59 MJ ha-1, respectively. Tsatsarelis and Koundouras [2] calculated the energy inputs for alfalfa whole production life (4 years) in Greece as 116 GJ ha-1, and Mobtaker et al. [20] calculated the energy inputs for alfalfa whole production life (7 years) in Iran as 810.57 GJ ha-1
Among the different energy sources, electricity for irrigation was the highest energy consumer in different alfalfa harvesting systems. Having deep wells in the region and not using modern efficient irrigation methods are among the reasons of high consumption of electrical energy in the studied region. In order to reduce the electricity consumption, using of modern methods of irrigation with high efficiency can be suggested.
After electricity for irrigation, diesel fuel had the most share of total energy consumption. The alfalfa hay and alfalfa silage diesel fuel energies were found with a share of 33.22 and 30.95%, respectively. The most difference between...

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.... In the surveyed region, human labors are mainly employed for irrigation and harvesting operations. Pishgar komleh et al. [19] estimated the sensitivity of energy inputs on corn silage production. They reported that major MPP was due to seed energy (0.87), followed by fertilizer energy (0.62). Mobtaker et al. [20] estimated the sensitivity of energy inputs on alfalfa hay productivity. They reported that major MPP was due to machinery energy (5.094), followed by seed energy (4.986).
The value of MPP for DE, IDE, RE and NRE were in the range of 0.16-1.42 (Table 7). This indicates that an additional use of 1 MJ of each of these energy forms would lead to an additional increase in yield by 0.16-1.42 Kg. Mobtaker et al. [20] and Hatirli et al. [24] have also reported similar results for alfalfa hay production in Iran and energy use in Turkish agriculture, respectively.
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