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Affairs, Nick, and Gatsby in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

Nick is the narrative reader in The Great Gatsby. Gatz was a poor person that changes his name to Gatsby. Tom was a cheater and was unfaithful to Daisy. Daisy was a flirt and rich. Myrtle is a poor women that lived over her and her husband’s garage shop. Myrtle would let Tom push her around because he was a rich man that would let Myrtle forget that she was poor.
“She never loved you, do you hear he cried. She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me (Fitzgerald 139)”. Tom is married to Daisy (Lisca). Even though daisy is marring Tom, Daisy has feeling for Gatsby (Lisca). Tom and Daisy relationship is wrong because they are married. People may say that Tom and Daisy does not love each other. When it was a week after their honeymoon, Tom and a girl got a wreck and the girl broke her arm and was a maid from the hotel where Tom and Daisy had their honeymoon (Lisca). Daisy was remembering a time at their wedding where the thought that tom collapse on the floor but it was someone else (Fitzgerald 136).
Daisy knows that Tom is cheating on her with Myrtle; Tom has a mistress named Myrtle (Hays, “Oxymoron”). Tom is seeing a girl named Myrtle Wilson. When Nick followed Tom to New York and saw Tom, pick up Myrtle, which is Tom’s mistress (Hays, “Oxymoron”). Tom told Myrtle to sit in another seat because he did not want people to think he was cheating on Daisy (Lisca). Myrtle is married George Wilson who owns Wilson’s gas station. When Nick saw, Tom goes in the Garage of George Wilson to see Myrtle (Fitzgerald 28). Mr. Wilson does not know that Myrtle is cheating him with Tom. George owns a shabby apartment highlight the affair within Tom and Myrtle along with the splendor of Gatsby’s house (Doreski). Wh...

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