Advantages And Disadvantages Of Traditional Students In Higher Education

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In higher education, traditional students are characterized as 18-22 in age, majority Caucasian, full-time and interested extra-curricular activities (Falk & Blaylock, 2010). Today’s undergraduate students are classified as “digital natives,” because of their advanced exposure to the Internet, social media and other technology since birth (Liang 2010). The digital natives who started their undergraduate education in fall 2013 grew up when PCs, email, text messages, DVDs, smartphones, and the Internet already existed (Levine & Dean, 2013). Google, file sharing, Skype, YouTube, and Facebook existed by the time digital natives entered middle school, they were introduced to the iPhone before high school, and they in college they expect to communicate …show more content…

Studies show that nontraditional students over the age of 30 are more likely to succeed in online classes than traditional students because they tend to be more engaged with their courses, have better time management and value exchanges with their peers and instructors (Dibiase & Kidwai, 2010). In a course study at a U.S. university it was found that traditional students logged into class less frequently than nontraditional students, contributed less in class discussions, asked routine rather than substantive questions, but scored equally on assignments (Dibiase & Kidwai, 2010). The study also showed that nontraditional students enrolled in courses they felt would advance their careers while many traditional students only enrolled in courses to fulfill degree requirements (Dibiase & Kidwai, …show more content…

As competition in higher education increases, power is shifting into the hands students who will soon be able to virtually choose any university they desire online (Harden, 2013). In a survey of student affairs officers, it was found that 80% of college campuses are experiencing increased technology demand by students (Levine & Dean, 2013). In the classrooms administrators must find ways to compete with electronic and virtual distractions and find new technologies engage and retain the attention of students (Hoskins,

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