preview

Adapting Talk Therapy to Counseling Methods

Better Essays
Some people view counseling as a “cure all” solution to the problems in their personal or professional life, while others see it simply as pointless. The problem is there are the ones who may not know which type of therapeutic approach may be more suitable to the exact nature of what they need the counseling for. The purpose of this paper is to show how talk therapy may need adapted with different counseling methods with 3 specific diagnoses and how their approach is able to help with specific mental issues through research. Introduction Therapy has long since been viewed in certain circles as a taboo. If you are in therapy there must be something wrong with you. This is heard from people with closed minds and closed opinions. Sometimes it is better (if not easier) to talk to someone you do not really know in order to get your head on straight. Talk therapy is an excellent way to get out what you need to talk about to an impartial person who can see where your true problems lie and how to fix whatever the problem may be (Ford-Martin & Cataldo 1551). When speaking with a spouse, significant other, or someone you are close to it can be more difficult to truly open up for fear of hurting someone’s feelings or driving someone away because you are not sure how to put it into words to them to avoid such a complication in communication (Ford-Martin & Cataldo 1551). However, some people see talk therapy as a “cure all”, when it is not. “Talk therapy” is a lay term for psychotherapy which began with the psychoanalytical approach by Sigmund Freud in the 1890’s and has expanded from his theory to a number of forms presently available (“Talk Therapy” 1144). The focus of this type of therapy is client-centered to allow the client to... ... middle of paper ... ...ichael Mooney. "Borderline personality disorder." The Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders. Ed. Madeline Harris and Ellen Thackerey. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2003. 142-144. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 12 Mar. 2014. Leaver, Judy. "Grief." The Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders. Ed. Madeline Harris and Ellen Thackerey. Vol. 1. Detroit: Gale, 2003. 459-461. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 15 Mar. 2014. "Talk Therapy." The Gale Encyclopedia of Mental Health. Ed. Laurie J. Fundukian and Jeffrey Wilson. 2nd ed. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 2008. 1144. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 01 Mar. 2014. Turkington, Carol A., and Jill Ilene Granger. "Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder." The Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Ed. Deirdre S. Blanchfield and Jacqueline L. Longe. 2nd ed. Vol. 4. Detroit: Gale, 2002. 2685-2687. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 10 Mar. 2014.
Get Access