Acquainted With The Night And Emily Dickinson's Acquainted With The Night

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Great poetry is thought to never be fully understood by readers and even by those that devout their career and time to being experts on it. People can spend countless hours analyzing a poem, but may never fully understand exactly what the author was writing about. Readers must both compare and contrast different works and prior knowledge to draw conclusions about poetic pieces. In Emily Dickinson’s poem written in 1862, first published in 1935, “We grow accustomed to the Dark“, and Robert Frost’s 1927 poem, “Acquainted with the Night”, the two poems both convey the unrelenting darkness and night in the world. Although, Frost has often times written about the beauty of nature in his poems, if you take a close look, there can be a dark connotation…show more content…
Both poets prove that the darkness of which they speak of is greatly misconceived by many, they convey that the “dark” (Dickinson 1) or “night” (Frost 1) is often misunderstood and that something’s are “neither wrong nor right” (Frost 14). These poems of great darkness attempt to shed “newness of the night” (Dickinson 2) to their audience, or in Dickinson’s case never intending to publish her works, her own self. They attempt to enlighten their readers,, a loose term,, and gain a new understanding of the unknown darkness and night that society has black-labeled and ostracized. Even more, there are a few common reoccurring archetypes in literature that stay consistent in most literary works, universal patterns such as; the rise and the fall, the mentor and the student, the journey and the ending, and the most pertinent and commonly used; the good and the evil, with light always being embodied by good and darkness always being the symbol of evil. But really what is darkness and light? Scientifically speaking, similarly just as darkness and light, cold does not truly exist it is just simply a space that heat does not reach. So technically, light and dark are not truly comparable with the archetypical good and evil. Society has taken…show more content…
Both poets prove that the darkness of which they speak of is greatly misconceived by many, they convey that the “dark” (Dickinson 1) or “night” (Frost 1) is often misunderstood and that something’s are “neither wrong nor right” (Frost 14). These poems of great darkness attempt to shed “newness of the night” (Dickinson 2) to their audience, or in Dickinson’s case never intending to publish her works, her own self. They attempt to enlighten their readers,, a loose term,, and gain a new understanding of the unknown darkness and night that society has black-labeled and ostracized. Even more, there are a few common reoccurring archetypes in literature that stay consistent in most literary works, universal patterns such as; the rise and the fall, the mentor and the student, the journey and the ending, and the most pertinent and commonly used; the good and the evil, with light always being embodied by good and darkness always being the symbol of evil. But really what is darkness and light? Scientifically speaking, similarly just as darkness and light, cold does not truly exist it is just simply a space that heat does not reach. So technically, light and dark are not truly comparable with the archetypical good and evil. Society has taken

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