Accident Case Study: American Airlines Flight 1420

1980 Words8 Pages
Fifteen years have passed since American Airlines flight 1420 experienced a botched landing tragically killing 10 passengers, the captain, and injuring 110 others. Thankfully, 24 passengers were uninjured, and the first officer survived. This horrific accident could have turned out much worse, but it could have also been easily avoided. June 1st, 1999, captain Richard Buschmann and first officer Michael Origel were about to embark on their third and final leg of the day, after already working for ten hours on two other trip legs. They had arrived at Dallas/Fort Worth Texas around 20:10 CST and were eager to proceed on their final trip of the day to Little Rock, Arkansas. Poor weather in the region prevented their assigned aircraft from arriving on time, closely pushing them ever closer to their fourteen hour duty limits for the day. The first officer realizing their situation contacted the dispatchers to notify them they would need to find a substitute aircraft or the flight would need to be cancelled. Both pilots were well aware of the impending storms in the area, including around the destination airport, but they decided that they should be able to beat the storms there. This was one of the first signs of suffering from get-there-itis, along side of several hazardous attitudes. Once an aircraft was substituted, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9-82, the pilots were able to depart at 22:40, 2 hours and 12 minutes after their scheduled departure time, 12 hours into their 14 hour duty day. On this leg of their long day, the captain was the flying pilot in control of the aircraft, and the first officer was the non-flying pilot, handling such things as navigation and the radios. After only 14 minutes in the air, 22:54, they received the fi... ... middle of paper ... ...t. 1999. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. . United States of America. Department of Transportation. FAA. Human Error and Commercial Aviation Accidents: A Comprehensive, Fine-Grained Analysis Using HFACS. FAA, July 2006. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. . United States of America. Department of Transportation. FAA. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System–HFACS. By Scott A. Shappell and Douglas A. Wiegmann. National Technical Information Service, Feb. 2000. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. . United States of America. Department of Transportation. NTSB. DCA99MA060. NTSB, 28 May 2002. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. .

More about Accident Case Study: American Airlines Flight 1420

Open Document