A comparison of the plot development of King Lear and Much Ado About Nothing

829 Words4 Pages
There are many things that you have to consider when you are writing a play or a story, about anything. The most important thing to consider when writing something is the plot development and how you are going to set everything up to make the ending fabulous! The play King Lear by William Shakespeare, and the play Much Ado About Nothing also by Shakespeare are very good examples of a writer setting up a play with a well thought out plot development. Shakespeare uses a lot of dramatic irony in his plays, and this always helps the reader get set up for what is coming after that. The play King Lear and the play Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare each have their own use of plot development, but they also share some qualities as well.
The play King Lear by William Shakespeare was written with a very well thought out plot development that makes it a very intriguing story. “The story opens in ancient Britain, where the elderly King Lear is deciding to give up his power and divide his realm amongst his three daughters, Cordelia, Regan, and Goneril. Lear's plan is to give the largest piece of his kingdom to the child who professes to love him the most, certain that his favorite daughter, Cordelia, will win the challenge.” (Mabillard) These opening lines set up the rest of the story and kind of give readers an in site to what the daughters of the king are like, and what the king himself is like. “Meanwhile, Shakespeare develops the play's sub-plot, which involves a guy named Gloucester, who's in the habit of running around town calling his illegitimate son, Edmund, a "bastard" and cracking dirty jokes about Edmund's unmarried mom.” (Atwood) Shakespeare was able to make this play easy for readers to read because it wasn’t a slow ...

... middle of paper ...

...hought out plot development. The play King Lear and the play Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare are very similar in their use of plot development, even despite their differences.

Works Cited

Atwood, Brandon, ed. King Lear Summary. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. .
Bates, Alfred, ed. Much Ado. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. .
Cairncross, Andrew, ed. Renaissance. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. .
Esser, Liza, ed. Much Ado. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. .
Mabillard, Amanda, ed. Tragedy of King Lear. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Jan. 2014. .
Open Document