A View from the Bridge

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A View from the Bridge There are moments of great tension in this play. Tracing the developments of Eddies obsession, show how Miller creates and builds up tension, particularly in the final part of Act 1. How would the tension be shown dramatically? 'A View from the Bridge' is a play based on pride & justice and Sicilian Honour. There is fine line between natural justice and that that is provided by the law. The theme of 'Justice provided by the law,' starts right at the beginning of the play with Alfieri's opening speech. As a lawyer, he tells the watching audience of his experiences with the people of Brooklyn, "After all, who have I dealt with in my life? Longshoreman and their wives, and fathers and grandfathers, compensation cases, evictions, family squabbles - the petty troubles of the poor…" The perception of law and lawyers in Brooklyn is not entirely friendly. The people of Brooklyn prefer not to bother with the authorities at a time of legal need. These people would much rather sought out their problems by enforcing Natural Justice, they would deal with a situation in their own way. The community of Brooklyn has its Sicilian Honour, this is a community of people who are against law and order. They find it unlucky to pass a lawyer on the street, in the eyes of Brooklyn people, lawyers are connected with evil and disasters and people would rather not get to close. This play provides the watching audience with a lot of natural justice from the main characters, Eddie, Marco and Beatrice when she intervenes with Eddies and Catherine's relationship. The natural justice with Eddie is with Marco and Rodolpho, Eddie here has taken the law into his own hands and betraying Marco and Rodolph... ... middle of paper ... ... It is now that the tension levels have reached a record breaking high, but that record is broken just a few Brooklyn days later when Marco is released and confronts Eddie. Eddie is very confident and doesn't feel any fear of Marco, Eddie is advised by Beatrice, Catherine and Rodolpho that Marco will seriously kill him and that he should just stay away. However, Eddie couldn't let himself look like a wus towards Marco and so decides to confront him outside. Unknown to the watching audience, Eddie is actually armed, but not dangerous! As Marco tries to seriously harm Eddie, Eddie pulls out his pen knife and the audience a watching have come to their own conclusion that Marco is going to be given the stab, but unsuspectedly tension levels are breaking more world-wide records and Marco decides to take his personal law into his own hands and kills Eddie.

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