A Doll's House Symbolism Analysis

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Symbolism is one of the literary devices commonly used in drama. The symbol imparts the hidden meanings other than the apparent ones and also shows the emotional effects on the characters. Though A Doll 's House is not only realistic, but a naturalistic drama, Ibsen has made extensive use of symbolism in its setting, the use of imagery, and even in actions. The luxurious and harmonious looking scene at the beginning and the gradual degradation of that spick and span room of Nora is a symbolic setting. The images of macaroons, stove, Christmas tree, New Year’s Day, black shawl, and most importantly the door is among the most symbolic images in the play. Actions like Nora 's dance and her hide and seek with the children are also symbolic in meaning. The macaroons that Nora eats and Helmer prohibits her from eating stand for her innocence, childishness and happy-go-lucky…show more content…
Christine was the same as Nora when she was originally with Krogstad. Krogstad is society 's doll. He is under the control over social standards that keep him from climbing the ladder of success. Doctor Rank is Death 's doll. At the end of the play, Torvald realizes that he has been a doll all along and how Nora has felt. His closing words, "The most wonderful thing of all--?" show that he realizes what he has done to Nora and how she felt about their marriage being one-sided. He was his own doll all along. According to Julia Kristeva, “… women are kept under male suppression. Women 's yearning to equal social status, access to equal opportunities, and right to expression have encountered stiff resistance over the ages.” Men usually take control of their female significant others; women are not as powerful as men in relationships. She also thinks that the symbolic concept of language used in this play “refers to the sense of possession” as Torvald calls his wife from his room questioning, “Is that my little lark twittering out
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