A Doll's House Justification Analysis

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Without Justification in A Doll’s House A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen, has created huge controversy since its creation in 1879. In fact, in order for Ibsen’s play to be shown in some theatres, he was required to rewrite an alternative ending, which he called “a barbaric outrage.” The three-act play is about an everyday housewife and mother of three children, Nora Helmer. In order to save her husband’s life, she forges her dying father’s signature and takes out a loan from Nils Krogstad. She spares any money Torvald gives her and secretly writes documents for money to pay back the loan in small portions. When her husband is promoted to manager at the bank, his first task is to terminate Krogstad. Krogstad threatens to tell Torvald about the…show more content…
This thought cannot be accurately proven. In fact, she is found playing hide and go seek in act one. The narrator says, “the children and Nora play the game both in the living room and in the room next to it” (Ibsen 347). Supporters might also say Nora is right for leaving her children because they would suffer from her crime. Even if her crime did affect her children it would not be as severe as the effect of losing their mom. According to Siddall, numerous people suppose a father’s responsibility to his children is not as demanding as a mother’s responsibility (42). Saying that means Nora has a greater role in the children’s lives and depriving them of her will have an enormous impact. At the end of act three, Torvald tells Nora, “before everything else, you are a wife and a mother” (Ibsen 386). Whether Nora wants to believe it or not, Torvald is right; no mother should choose their self over their parental responsibility. Nora to have three children with Torvald and by doing so, she assured each of her children she would take care of them. The need of a mother starts in the womb and does not end there. Through the umbilical cord, the child trusts the mother to provide everything the child needs to develop. Once the baby is born the physical connection is cut and the child begins the emotional and mental connection to the mother. Nora’s children…show more content…
When two people become one through marriage, they are choosing to give their life to their significant other despite their flaws. Lou Salome brings up a valuable point when he says, “For the husband who towers so high above her has not inclined himself to give fatherly solicitude and accustomed sustenance, but out of his free choice has elevated her to be his wife, to be one within” (69). In other words, although Torvald is not always perfect (and neither is Nora), he still chose Nora to be his wife. No relationship, whether it is mother and daughter, father and son, best friends, boyfriend and girlfriend, or husband and wife, no relationship is impeccable. Relationships, especially marriage, like Nora and Torvald, are bound to have disagreements and face complications along the way, that’s how many will develop and become stronger, they overcome challenging times. Torvald demonstrated his love and support throughout the play. In act two, Nora pleads for her husband to call the maid back from giving her blackmailer, Krogstad, his dismissal letter. Nora says to Torvald, “Do you hear me, Torvald, call her back! You don’t know what this letter can do to us” (Ibsen 361). Nora becomes distraught and Torvald comforts her by saying, “Well, well, we’ll share the burden, Nora, as man and wife should” (Ibsen 361). This quote is significant because it suggests Torvald
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