A Doll's House Identity Essay

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Some people will search their whole life, trying to find themselves and what their purpose is in life. They seem to have no identity and have trouble finding one. This is the case for Nora Helmer, the protagonist in A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen. Webster’s Dictionary defines identity as “the qualities, beliefs, etc., that make a particular person or group different from others.” Nora has to follow her husband’s rules and live up to his expectations, not being able to be herself. Nora is portrayed as a doll, hence the title, always following the rules of others, as if she’s in a dream like state. Throughout the play, Nora searches for her identity; slowly inching away from whom her husband wants her to be. Nora, from the start of…show more content…
She even has to hide things from him such as her macaroons, since he doesn’t allow her to eat sweets being that he wants her to keep her shape. Torvald even calls Nora pet names to show he is her master. “My sweet tooth really didn’t make a little detour through the confectioner’s” (Ibsen 853). Nora tries to blame others for her actions and not take responsibility for what she has done, such as the macaroons in the house.Nora instead of taking the blame, puts it all on Mrs. Linde for bringing the macaroons in the house. In this aspect, Nora is being treated like a child by Torvald, so she acts like one; This shows how immature Nora is and doesn’t know how to act. Nora her whole life is always being forced to follow the rules of others, with not only Torvald, but her own father. Nora never had the chance to find who she was, being why now, she doesn’t know her true identity, having no choice but to follow in the footsteps of others. Towards the end of the play, Torvald himself admits to treating Nora as a pet, giving her commands and rewarding her. “Oh, quit posing.…show more content…
Nora’s realization, however, gives her the courage to sit Torvald down and tell him she’s done being his doll. She takes a stand for herself, telling Torvald he never truly loved her. “I mean, then I went from Papa’s hands into yours. You arranged everything to your own taste, and so I got the same taste as you - or I pretended to; I can’t remember. I guess a little of both, first one, then the other. Now when I look back, it seems as if I’d lived here like a beggar - just from hand to mouth. I’ve lived by doing tricks for you, Torvald. But that’s the way you wanted it. It’s a great sin what you and Papa did to me. You’re to blame that nothing’s become of me” (Ibsen 904). Nora doesn’t want the life of a doll anymore; Nora is sicked of being played with and wants better for herself. This is why she decides she needs to leave Torvald, to stop loving him, and find
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