Essay On Sign Language

Essay On Sign Language

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There are many forms of non-verbal communication. These may include: writing, bodily motions, facial expression, smelling, whistle, drumming, touching etc. According to Salzmann, Stanlaw & Adachi (2015) “The term nonverbal communication, taken literally, refers to the transmission of signals by means other than spoke words.” The form of nonverbal communication I will be focused on is sign language. Sign language plays a major role in American communities for the deaf and the mute, so they may be able to communicate with their friends and families. In America they practice the American Sign Language or Ameslan Sign Language. This paper will focus on “The Development of Sign Language.”
This paper will define the term sign language, give a brief history of how sign language was created, types of sign languages, grammar and syntax within American Sign Language, and sign language as a form of communication with animals.
According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, “Sign language is a formal language employing a system of hand gestures for communication (as by the deaf) or an unsystematic method of communicating chiefly by manual gestures used by people speaking different languages.” Sign language uses hand gestures and is mostly used by the deaf and people who are mute. Sign language is believed to be present in the Western world around the early 17th century. The system of signing is made up of hand movements to represent the alphabet, conventional gestures, hand signs, mimic and finger spelling. Sign language is one of the earliest and most simple forms of communication among humans. We use sign language when emphasizing in speech and when waving goodbye or hello to another person.
Sign language is a visual form of communication...


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...n Sign Language (ASL), you will have to abandon all the rules in English and be more graphic. This is because American Sign Language (ASL) is a visual-spatial language and it does not have the same grammatical make up as the English language. Facial gestures, hand movements and other bodily gestures are essential for the American Sign Language grammar. Like spoken language, in American Sign Language (ASL), there is the study of phonemes, morphemes, hold-movement-hold theory, pragmatics and semantics. Pragmatics is the utilization of language, while semantics is related to meaning. Register relates to changing sign language to adjust to different settings. There are five different types of registers, these include: Consultative, Formal, Casual, Intimate, and Frozen. These are important to aid in better communication if there is full understanding of all the registers.

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Essay On Sign Language

- There are many forms of non-verbal communication. These may include: writing, bodily motions, facial expression, smelling, whistle, drumming, touching etc. According to Salzmann, Stanlaw & Adachi (2015) “The term nonverbal communication, taken literally, refers to the transmission of signals by means other than spoke words.” The form of nonverbal communication I will be focused on is sign language. Sign language plays a major role in American communities for the deaf and the mute, so they may be able to communicate with their friends and families....   [tags: Sign language, American Sign Language]

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