The Equal Pay Act Of 1963 Essay

The Equal Pay Act Of 1963 Essay

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Separate but equal was a phrase used often to explain discrepancies in treatment between peoples, even when the reality was nothing so fair. However, this was not always the case in the United States of America. Since the Equal Pay Act of 1963, the wages of women versus men have been steadily converging, with a decrease in the rate of convergence since the 1990s (Blau 2000).
In fact, since wage inequality has been in existence since the creation of the United States, it wasn 't until the early 1900s that gender inequality was even a bad thing (Coontz 2013). During World War 2, women were hired in mass to do jobs traditionally for men, as the men were off fighting the war. It was in 1942 that the National War Labor Board recommended for employers to make “adjustments which equalize wage or salary rates paid to females with the rates paid to males for comparable quality and quantity of work on the same or similar operations” (Brunner 2007). However, this advice was not followed, and as the second World War came to a close, women lost their job to the men returning to their positions and found that they were being paid far less for their effort. This wage inequality was so severe than in the 1960s, women were paid less than 60% of what their male counterparts earned (Pay Equity 2014). This was the environment where women 's right 's activists in the United States, such as Winifred Stanley and Katharine St. George, presided in Congress as insider claimsmakers. As the 20th century began, several avenues for the social problem of wage inequality came to the forefront. Firstly, there have been changes in the cultural perceptions on what women 's roles are, even in regard to feminism. Secondly, numerous laws, amendments, and act have be...


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...ted businesses from blatantly engaging in workplace discrimination. While these laws have not been 100 percent effective in solving this issue, as the pay gap still exists despite these laws, they are correlated to helping. Aids from society, in the sense that America no longer views the classic 1950s model nuclear family as the one and only way for a family to run has allowed women a new way to enter the workforce and being successful. Americans, in general, view women as being as competent at their careers as their male counterparts, and with the growing presence of women in the workforce this has worked to decrease the pay gap. Lastly, while women are still immensely underrepresented in the United States government, the number of women inside of government is slowly increasing, which is allowing women to have an increased voice in government policies and affairs.

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