The Effects of Prohibition in Scoiety Essay

The Effects of Prohibition in Scoiety Essay

Length: 1336 words (3.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Imagine a world without alcohol. For a total of thirteen years, many Americans lived in a life with no alcohol. During these thirteen years, crime and murder rates rose dramatically. “Prohibition lasted twelve years, ten months, nineteen days during which crime, corruption, and cynicism led a large majority of Americans to conclude that the noble experiment had been a disastrous mistake” (“National” 143). Prohibition was perhaps America’s greatest failure because it altered Americans’ views on the use of alcohol.
Congress created and passed the 18th Amendment was made because they thought it could end ignorance, poverty, violence, public gruff, and disease (“National” 50). The 18th Amendment makes the sale, manufacturing, and transportation of alcohol illegal (“Jan.” par. 1). On January 16, 1919, Prohibition took effect in the United States (“Jan.” par. 3). With the start of Prohibition, many people thought that sales would increase. Miserably, the opposite happens and sales dramatically decrease. Prohibition, also known as the Noble Experiment, because many people did not know what would happen if American were alcohol free (Lerner par. 2). In 1919, the Volstead Act was created to enforce the new 18th Amendment (Cooper as sited by Dudley and Chalberg 93). Moreover, the legal alcohol content of alcohol under the Volstead Act was 0.5 percent (“National” 79). With the banning of alcohol, many businesses could barely stay open. Some bars stayed open by selling products such as non-alcoholic beverages (“The Prohibition” par. 6). During World War one, there was a Prohibition that took effect because the grain was needed for the war efforts (“The Prohibition” par 4). During this time, alcohol was legal, but the alcohol content could ...


... middle of paper ...


... Novick revisit Prohibition.” America 10 Oct. 2011: Web. 24 Feb. 2014. .
Severn, Bill. The End of the Roaring Twenties: Prohibition and Repeal. New York: Julian Messener, 1969. Print.
Stayton, William H. “Prohibition is a Failure.” Ed. William Dudley and John C. Chalberg. Detroit: Gale Cengage Learning, 2007. 94-96. Print.
"TIME TRIP." Current Events, a Weekly Reader publication 17 Nov. 2000: 2. Global Issues in Context. Web. 24 Feb. 2014. .

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about The Effects of Prohibition upon American Society

- The second decade of the twentieth century, affectionately referred to as the “Roaring Twenties,” was a truly spectacular time in American history. The era was characterized by incredible and irresponsible economic prosperity where the incredibly wealthy enjoyed unfathomable amounts of money. With the advent of Jazz music, the further progression of women’s rights, and the rapid advancement of technology, American society seemed to be nearing a golden age. Unfortunately, all was not golden in the United States in the 1920s....   [tags: prohibition era, anti saloon league, alcohol]

Strong Essays
2011 words (5.7 pages)

The Prohibition Amendment Essay

- The Prohibition Amendment, which took effect on January 16, 1920, outlawed the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcohol in the United States and its territories, until its repeal on December 5, 1933. Today, Prohibition is often referred to as the “Noble Experiment” because it was created to reduce the adverse effects that alcohol had on families and society. Excessive consumption of alcohol, primarily by men, often resulted in domestic violence, poor work performance, and wasteful spending of wages on alcohol, which were needed to support families....   [tags: alcohol prohibition, crime]

Strong Essays
1823 words (5.2 pages)

The Prohibition Of The 18th Amendment Essay

- Imagine a strange man is recklessly driving on the freeway late at night. The police began to chase him down. They tell him to get out, and they start to test his basic motor skills, mental ability, and his breath for signs of intoxication. He fails this test and is arrested for drunk driving. What is the catalyst responsible for his apprehension; is it his poor choices or is it the alcohol he drank. Obviously, it is the alcohol followed by his choice to drink and drive which inhibited necessary basic skills that got him arrested....   [tags: Prohibition in the United States]

Strong Essays
719 words (2.1 pages)

The Prohibition Era During The 1920s Essay

- The Prohibition Era, much like it’s sister the Temperance movement, saw America split between the wets and the drys. However, it is in the Prohibition era where we see government on the federal and executive level come out and play a role in the movement. It is also a time of complete and utter chaos, with the upraise of gangsters and high levels of crime that broke out daily. The rise of social justice issues for immigrants whose culture and lifestyle begin to be targeted. It also was a time when America learned that passing a law without the full support of all the people will cause it to fail....   [tags: Prohibition in the United States]

Strong Essays
1347 words (3.8 pages)

Essay Prohibition: A Call For Reformation

- During the late eighteenth century, reformers and politics debated the sale of alcohol for many reasons. Issues such as prohibition caused many individuals to engage in politics and propaganda sometimes took the focus off the real problems. President Cleveland won the election in 1884 for the Republican Party, it was said to have been because of a quote by a Republican clergyman. Directed primarily toward Democrats, it labeled them the party of “rum, Romanism, and rebellion.” In 1850 annual consumption of beer had reached up to 2.7 gallons per capita but had risen dramatically to 17.9 gallons per capita in 1880....   [tags: Prohibition, alcohol, history,]

Strong Essays
935 words (2.7 pages)

Essay on Prohibition of All Drugs

- Drug use is dangerous, because it tears apart families, it is addictive, and it destroys lives. Since these problems can develop from any kind of substance abuse, there should be a national prohibition of all forms of drugs, even medical or “soft” drugs. Take for example two exceedingly popular legal drugs, Tobacco and Alcohol. These substances have been proven to be dangerous enough to justify a prohibition, as they are can cause just as much harm as the already illegal drugs. For example: every year 443,000 Americans die from smoking cigarettes ("Tobacco Facts and Figures") and 88,000 ("Alcohol Use and Health")....   [tags: Prohibition, drugs, Marijuana]

Strong Essays
1055 words (3 pages)

The Consequences of Prohibition Essay

- A short introduction A lot of things happened in 1920 – USA was one of the victors in the first World War, and had a good period. Soon that was changed and USA suffered from many things, the great crash, prohibition and gang wars. But not only bad things happened – there was also the new deal, new cultures, new poets and writers. The thing i want to write about is prohibition, that was a really big deal – lots of books have been written about this subject, why it happened, which consequences it had and so on....   [tags: History US Prohibition Alcohol]

Strong Essays
1494 words (4.3 pages)

Essay on Prohobition

- PROHIBITION In all probability, no one thing gave more character to the era known as the ‘Roaring 20s’, than what was called ‘the long dry spell’ (a.k.a. Prohibition). Prohibition was the result, of the longstanding efforts, by largely Protestant religious groups, who had preached temperance since the early colonial period. What had been known as the temperance movement came to be a drive for all out prohibition right about the turn of the century. From about 1900-1904 there was a dramatic turn of events in which the Anti-Saloon League changed its goals from social reform to legislate reform, and came to have a fair amount of influence in this country’s politics....   [tags: Essays Papers Alcohol 18th Amendment]

Strong Essays
1200 words (3.4 pages)

Prohibition Essay

- Prohibition Prohibition One of the most controversial, the Eighteenth, and later, its repeal, the Tweny-First amendment, made a big impact on America, and their ideas are still talked about today. Prohibition has had many different view points from the beginning. Prohibition started long before the Eighteenth Amendment. Organizations against alcohol such as the Anti-Saloon League and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union were succeeding in enacting local prohibition laws, turning the campaign into a national effort....   [tags: Papers]

Strong Essays
467 words (1.3 pages)

Prohibition Essay

- On the 18th of December 1917, Congress sent to the states the 18th Amendment, which one-year after ratification on the 16th of January 1818 banned the manufacture, sale or transport of intoxicating liquors. In 1919 the Volstead Act defined as "intoxicating" all beverages containing more than 0.5 percent alcohol, which then became illegal once the 18th Amendment went into effect in 1920. Prohibition of alcohol in America between 1920 and 1933 was undertaken to reduce crime and corruption, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and improve health in America....   [tags: American History]

Free Essays
977 words (2.8 pages)