Early American Colonies Essay

Early American Colonies Essay

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The Massachusetts colony, otherwise known as the ‘Massachusetts Bay colony’ was originally settled by Puritans in 1630. They were plagued by the religious persecutions of King Charles I and the Church of England. Weary from this dogged torment, they left England under the leadership of John Winthrop. These original colonists quickly established many small towns in the name of high religious ideals and strict societal rules. They also planted churches, spread Puritanism and religiously educated the masses, as these were some of their goals. A utopian society that other colonies looked upon with high regards was the ultimate goal.
The charter that gave the Puritans freedom to leave the England had a significant loophole-the colony did not have to have a leader that represented them in England. This new government was placed in the seemingly capable hands of a governor, deputy governor and eighteen assistants, all of which were considered to be ‘freemen’. They then established a representative democratic government by which only property owning freemen who were members of the church could have a vote. The formulation of this kind of government was an early indicator of the colonists desires to be free of Britain. Winthrop was elected the first governor of the colony and he further enabled the colony to be virtually independent of Britain by laying a framework legislature that included a simple system of checks and balances along with representation. Boundaries, taxes and strict rules were also established, further severing the ties that bound the colony to England. Even though it was tragically flawed and did not last, it was a clear break from Britain’s monarchy. The flaw in the system was the element of human greed and K...


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...tober 29, 2010, from http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USABmapM.htm
Massachusetts Colony. (n.d.). Colonial Ancestors - Colonial Genealogy Records and History Information to Find Colonial Ancestors for Your Family Tree. Retrieved November 2, 2010, from http://colonialancestors.com/ma/colony.htm
Massachusetts Colony. (n.d.). Colonial Ancestors - Colonial Genealogy Records and History Information to Find Colonial Ancestors for Your Family Tree. Retrieved November 2, 2010, from http://colonialancestors.com/ma/colony.htm
THE QUAKER PROVINCE: 1681-1776. (n.d.). The Pennsylvania General Assembly. Retrieved November 9, 2010, from http://www.legis.state.pa.us/wu01/vc/visitor_info/pa_history/II.htm
Untitled Document. (n.d.). the Quaqua Society -Financial and Career Assistance for Home Educators. Retrieved November 1, 2010, from http://www.quaqua.org/pilgrim.htm




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