Dystopian Societies Essay

Dystopian Societies Essay

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A dystopia the darkest form of government, a utopia gone wrong, a craving for power, struggling for fewer rules. The dystopia is factual the worst possible form of a government. Its the struggle to be so perfect that it fails. There are typically two types of dystopias first a monarchy. A monarchy is a group of people controlled by a king or queen, and they make every last decision. What they want they get. A monarchy is typically born like this example from lord of the flies. “He became absorbed beyond mere happiness as he felt himself exercising control over living things. He talked to them, urging them, ordering them"(Golding 58). This shows that a monarchy starts by one just taking over from the start rather than being a "team player." A communistic government is the opposite of a monarchy in life style but ironically is not in their governing body. They rule by having everyone as an equal, so no one is poor and few people are rich. They are seemingly alike in so many ways. Amongst the political spectrum there are two dystopian governments more alike than as difference, communism and monarchy.


A monarchy the farthest right one can go on the political spectrum, dystopian ideas running at the max. In retrospect it's a single person in control. That's right a single person also know as the king a queen. In isn't like this person is a president with power to influence ideas and see if they go through, if the king wants it the king gets it. "The monarchs from places like Brunei, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Swaziland appear to continue to exercise more political influence than any other single source of authority in their nations, either by constitutional mandate or by tradition" (Monarchy). It's is arguably the...


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...ountries don't. We are lucky that we don't have to deal with war of bombs going off at our churches or houses or businesses. We are lucky. Dystopias have caught the best of us from the American Revolution to the Egyptian revolution. We did what we had to do to get our 1st amendment rights, and now the rest of the world follows.




Works Cited

"Communism Has Decided against God, against Christ, against the Bible, and Aga... - Billy Graham at Lifehack Quotes." Quote by Billy Graham. Lifehack.org/, n.d. Web. 17 Feb. 2014.
"Monarchy." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 16 Feb. 2014. Web. 17 Feb. 2014.
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Coward-McCann, 1962. 58. Print.
"North Korea." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 15 Feb. 2014. Web. 15 Feb. 2014
"French Revolution (1787-99)." Encyclopedia Britannica Online. Encyclopedia Britannica, n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2014.

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Dystopian Societies Essay

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