Dystopian Novels Essay

Dystopian Novels Essay

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According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, a dystopia is defined as “an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives” or an “anti-utopia”. The word “utopia” was first coined by Plato and later used by Sir Thomas More in 1516 in his book Utopia. The book features a fictional island named Utopia and all its customs. This book prompted and generated more innovative genres, including that of dystopian novels. Dystopian novels, like any other well-written novel, contain a strongly developed protagonist and a mysterious, controlling antagonist. Often, the author labels the government or leader of the corrupt society as the antagonist. The authors have a propensity to use the ignored social injustices in modern society and embellish them in a future society where they eventually lead to mankind’s demise. Frequently, the protagonist of the dystopian novel is the point of view from which the narrative is told. The protagonists tend to be characterized as rebels as they attempt to stay ethical and honorable in a depraved society. However, when the main character in some of the most well known dystopian novels revolts, he or she is less successful at staying moral than a more passive character.
For example, George Orwell’s 1984 features a society where the government watches the citizens’ every move. The government controls its people by terrorizing them and observing both their thoughts and actions. The story is told through Winston Smith’s perspective. Winston Smith works for the government, and at the beginning of the novel, he wouldn’t dare to take part in anything illegal. He lives his life very routinely until he decides to buy a journal. By this time, journals are illegal along with private thoughts. Winston...


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...character leads to success in keeping their ethical beliefs.
Readers want the main character of a dystopian novel to be rebellious and fight for what the character believes is right and just. Seemingly, rebelling and creating an uprising just kills the protagonist morally or physically, but the readers still wishes for a classic hero. They crave a protagonist with moral fiber that will stand up for his or her beliefs and slay the fraudulent government. “She is a flag on a hilltop, showing what can still be done: we too can be saved.” Nevertheless, dying for one’s morals does not give the impression of the correct choice. A protagonist in a dystopian novel desires to impact other characters. Persuading others is hard to do while dead. In order to be successful in impacting others and staying alive, the main character must stay under the radar and rebel quietly.

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Dystopian Novels Essay

- According to Merriam-Webster dictionary, a dystopia is defined as “an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives” or an “anti-utopia”. The word “utopia” was first coined by Plato and later used by Sir Thomas More in 1516 in his book Utopia. The book features a fictional island named Utopia and all its customs. This book prompted and generated more innovative genres, including that of dystopian novels. Dystopian novels, like any other well-written novel, contain a strongly developed protagonist and a mysterious, controlling antagonist....   [tags: utopia, Plato, antagonist, morals, rebel]

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