The Doctrine Of Natural Law Essay

The Doctrine Of Natural Law Essay

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Looking into Finnas’s idea that maybe it is possible that through family and friends one can satisfy all basic desires and goods, but the question still arises of how do humans know how to attain these desires or basic human principles? A baby cries when it is hungry or tired, without being told that it needs to eat or sleep. This example shows that there are innate truths or knowledge that are given to humans the day they are born. Even though Finnas does disagree with Aquinas’s arguments, there is no substantial evidence to prove that humans do not have innate knowledge just through being a human being. This point lines up with what Aquinas calls Natural Law, as previously mentioned. From Natural Law, human made laws are created for the good of the community in order for everyone to reach full human potential. Not only is the concepts that come from Natural Law innate, but they are necessary for human perfection. These innate truths, in which Aquinas included as part of his Natural Law, are still included in countries constitutions and are fought for today.
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