Differences between the Hungarian Revolution and the Prague Spring Essay

Differences between the Hungarian Revolution and the Prague Spring Essay

Length: 1095 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

When the Soviet Union annexed the countries of East Central Europe, it began to spread its communist influence amongst the countries. After the death of Joseph Stalin, the new leader of the Soviet Union, Nika Khrushchev, began changing the repressive policies of Stalin, which opened the doors to the countries of East Central Europe to challenge the rule of the Soviets. In both Hungary and Czechoslovakia, there were uprisings for independence from the Eastern Bloc. Although the Hungarian Revolution and the Prague Spring had the similar crushing defeat by a soviet invading force, the two uprising differed in outcomes due to Hungary’s nationalist attempt to break free from communism versus the Czechoslovak attempts to reform communism internally within the country.
At the conclusion of World War II, the people of Hungary got to experience for the first time in over a hundred years a chance to vote in elections and created their own government on the foundation of democratic principles. The Soviets had troops on the Hungarian border and were not concerned about assessing their control of Hungary until 1948. At that time the local favorite Imre Nagy and Laszlo Rajk were removed and replaced by the Stalin hardliner Rakoski. Rakoski asserted his absolute control over Hungary. He purged the communist party of Hungary of “Titotists” and forced indoctrination of Stalinism in the educational intuitions throughout Hungary. Hungary was one of the most repressed country sin East Central Europe until 1953 with the death of Josef Stalin.
When Josef Stalin died and leadership of the Soviet Union changed to Nika Khrushchev, the period of the soviet thaw had a profound effect on the countries of East Central Europe. Nagy was made Prime Min...


... middle of paper ...


... turn an ask for allies for assistance and to give the impression that the entire Warsaw Pact would not tolerate the reforms by Dubcek. The Czech’s did not have the military power to stand up against the countries of the Warsaw Pact and surrendered the entire reforms of the Dubcek Era. Unlike Nagy of Hungary, Dubcek was arrested but his life was spared by the soviets. The Prague Spring ended in a similar fashion as the Hungarian Revolution. Brezhnev would not allow any country within the Warsaw Pact to reform or change the communism within the country. He called up all the surrounding countries of the Warsaw Pact to invade Czechoslovakia to end the reforms. The difference from the Hungarian Revolution was that there was not a huge amount of the loss of life. The invasion of Prague was quick and swift and Soviet control was established once again. Brezhnev declared “

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Prague Spring

- The Prague Spring The Prague Spring is referred to when the Warsaw Pact allies invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968. Below are the details surrounding the incident. In 1948, communism was the only political party in Czechoslovakia. The communist take-over was a very popular movement. The first reason why it was a popular movement is because Joseph Stalin signed an agreement with Winston Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt that the Red Army, which would then lead to pro-communism, would liberate Czechoslovakia....   [tags: History Prague Spring Invasion]

Free Essays
1440 words (4.1 pages)

Essay on Hungarian Revolution of 1956

- Causes such as poverty, Soviet power, and change of Hungarian life ultimately led to the primary uprising known as the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. This event not only portrayed the initial precursor of instability, but also rebellion inside the Soviet Iron Curtain. The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 included effects such as a massive decrease in the global Communist party, an increase of the policy Containment in the Western Hemisphere, and polarization of the Cold War. In the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, The U.S.S.R....   [tags: Hungarian Revolution Essays]

Better Essays
1118 words (3.2 pages)

Essay on The Hungarian Revolution of 1956

- Following the death of Josef Stalin in 1953, the harsh policies he implemented in not only the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, but also its many satellite nations began to break down. There was a movement to distance all of the socialist nations from Stalin?s sadistic rule. In the Peoples. Republic of Hungary, there was much disillusionment with this Stalinist absolutism (Felkay 50). This disillusionment with the Soviet ideal of socialism lead the people of the fledgeling socialist state of Hungary to rise up in revolt, but ill-preparedness and the strength of the Soviet Red Army put down the insurrection within several days....   [tags: Hungarian Revolution Essays]

Free Essays
886 words (2.5 pages)

The Deportation of Hungarian Jews Essay

- Imagine you are in a camp. Not just any camp, but a camp where you are forced to work all day. This is what was happening during the Holocaust. In 1930, Hungary fell under the Nazi party’s influence. In 1940, Hungary joined the Axis powers. Hungary started putting anti-Jewish laws and decrees into place. There were 825,000 Jews in Hungary in 1941. Germany wanted Hungary to deport Hungarian Jews. Hungary decided not to because of political reasons. They wanted to avoid direct involvement in the war....   [tags: nazi, holocaust]

Better Essays
880 words (2.5 pages)

Hungarian Jews and the Holocaust Essay

- “There is a place on earth that is a vast desolate wilderness, a place populated by shadows of the dead in their multitudes, a place where the living are dead, where only death, hate and pain exist,” said Giuliana Tedeschi, a holocaust survivor (Tedeschi). The Hungarian Jews assumed they were the safest of all the Jewish groups and in the end suffered the most. Hundreds were shipped in cattle cars without supplies for days to concentration camps. Auschwitz, one of the furthermost used death camps was going under colossal change to prepare for the arrival of the unfortunate Hungarian Jews....   [tags: nazi, jews]

Better Essays
922 words (2.6 pages)

Essay about William Williams' Spring and All

- William Williams' "Spring and All" The Modernist era of poetry, like all reactionary movements, was directed, influenced, and determined by the events preceding it. The gradual shift away from the romanticized writing of the Victorian Era served as a litmus test for the values, and the shape of poetry to come. Adopting this same idea, William Carlos Williams concentrated his poetry in redirecting the course of Modernist writing, continuing a break from the past in more ways than he saw being done, particularly by T.S....   [tags: Williams Spring All Poetry Poem Essays]

Better Essays
2005 words (5.7 pages)

The Rites of Spring by Modris Eksteins Essay

- Modris Eksteins presented a tour-de-force interpretation of the political, social and cultural climate of the early twentieth century. His sources were not merely the more traditional sources of the historian: political, military and economic accounts; rather, he drew from the rich, heady brew of art, music, dance, literature and philosophy as well. Eksteins examined ways in which life influenced, imitated, and even became art. Eksteins argues that life and art, as well as death, became so intermeshed as to be indistinguishable from one another....   [tags: Eksteins Rites Spring]

Better Essays
1030 words (2.9 pages)

Essay about The Power of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring

- The Power of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring In 1962, Rachel Carson published Silent Spring and was greeted with a roar of protest and approval. After years and years of controversy and skepticism surrounding its argument, Silent Spring was and still is recognized as a perceptive warning of things in progress and things to come. The book set the stage for the first real and effectual environmental movement. In 17 chapters, many of which can stand alone as essays, Carson develops a deceptively simple premise: the use and overuse of synthetic chemicals to control insect pests introduces these chemicals into the air, water, and soil and into the food chain where they poison animals and humans,...   [tags: Silent Spring]

Better Essays
1472 words (4.2 pages)

Essay about The Conflicted Japan of Yukio Mishima’s Spring Snow

- The Conflicted Japan of Yukio Mishima’s Spring Snow Yukio Mishima was a revolutionary author. His dramatic public suicide is the perfect capstone to a life full of turmoil and unrest. Mishima himself was as conflicted as his many stories and plays, which tend to play out the problem of which direction is Japan heading, and should the nation be developing that way. Mishima romanticized the samurai and nurtured a lifelong affair with traditional Japanese theater. At the same time, he admired the West and studied Western art and literature avidly....   [tags: Spring Snow]

Better Essays
1627 words (4.6 pages)

Essay about The Poem Spring in Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience

- The Poem Spring in Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience In Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Blake differentiates between being experienced and being innocent. In the poem "Spring," the speaker focuses on the coming of spring and the excitement surrounding it which is emphasized by the trochaic meter of the poem. Everyone, including the animals and children, is joyful and getting ready for the new season, a season of rebirth and a new arrival of nature’s gifts. In the first stanza the use of sound--the flute--and the birds are important in showing that spring is an exciting season....   [tags: Spring Songs of Innocence and of Experience]

Better Essays
729 words (2.1 pages)