Essay on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders by Allen Frances

Essay on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders by Allen Frances

Length: 1573 words (4.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Term Papers

Open Document

Essay Preview

The overall message and core argument this book offers is that the new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the DSM-5, will cause an enormous increase of people who are not mentally ill being diagnosed with a mental disorder and receiving unnecessary treatment for it. Allen Frances argues that assigning everyday problems to mental disorders causes massive disadvantages for individuals and society. Diagnosing a healthy person as mentally ill will lead to unnecessary, harmful medications, the constricting of horizons, misallocation of medical recourses, and wasting the budgets of families and the state. He states as well that we do not take responsibility for our own mental well-being. We do not trust our self-healing brains anymore, which have kept us sane all this time, but we put our trust in the medications of the drug companies, the ‘’Big Pharma’’ as Frances calls it, which are making immense profits. According to Frances the DSM-5 will turn the current diagnostic inflation in the United States into hyperinflation by converting millions of ‘’normal’’ people into ‘’people with a mental disorder’’. This will cause that individuals who really need psychiatric help are ignored, while the ‘’worried well’’ receive most of the treatment, which will often causes nothing more than damage for them. Frances charts the history of psychiatric fads throughout history and argues that whenever we randomly label another aspect of the human condition a ‘’disease’’, we further drift away at our human adaptability and diversity, dulling everything what is normal and losing something fundamental of ourselves in the process.
Frances does not only criticize the DSM-5, he also admits that he has made some mistakes in ...


... middle of paper ...


...ns on television in the Unites States. Frances states that the drug companies make immense profits. This is because they intimidate psychiatrists to recommend their medications to their patients. Frances also says that the drug companies intimidate the psychiatrists to diagnose people with a mental disorder in order to subscribe medications to them whereby the drug companies make even more profits. The hyperinflation of mental disorders causes more people receiving medications and as a result more profits for the drug companies. Frances also questions the responsibility of the drug companies in the hyperinflation of diagnosis of people with mental disorders.
In short Frances wants to warn us of the danger and detrimental consequences of the hyperinflation of diagnosis of people with mental disorders and the responsibility of drug companies in all of this.



Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders: A Controversial History

- Crazy is a word with a thousand and one connotations meaning everything from being wildly enthusiastic, to displaying wild or aggressive behaviour. Psychologists have come to the understanding that the pop culture word crazy is synonymous with abnormal behaviour. Abnormal behaviour is difficult to define as the question it faces is who has the authority to differentiate between what is normal and what is abnormal. There are many questions which aid psychologists to differentiate between normal and abnormal, but the following four are the most commonly agreed upon (Rieger, 2011): 1. Is the behaviour statistically rare....   [tags: psychology, defining normal and abnormal]

Term Papers
1006 words (2.9 pages)

Psychiatric And Treatment Of Mental Disorders Essay

- Mental disorders: a topic that most, if not all of the population, has had to deal with on a personal level, whether they themselves are personally affected or a friend/family member is. Despite this connection, psychiatry—the study and treatment of mental illness— has had a complex, if not contradictory relationship in establishing itself as a science. The recent publication of the fifth edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) has attempted to do just that, creating a system that allegedly classifies and diagnoses mental disorders in an accurate, scientific way....   [tags: Psychiatry, Mental disorder, Psychology]

Term Papers
1057 words (3 pages)

Psychological And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders Essay

- Personality Disorders are becoming very common within humans as we age. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) states that to have a formal diagnosis of any personality disorder you must see a doctor and have various test done with the final results from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The following movies; “Welcome to Me” and “What happened, Miss Simone?” are about two women who experienced personality disorders, one being fictional and one being non-fiction....   [tags: Borderline personality disorder, Bipolar disorder]

Term Papers
1465 words (4.2 pages)

The Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders Essay

- Introduction Schizophrenia is a brain disorder characterized by hallucinations, paranoia, and out of touch with reality. It affects the individual’s thoughts, perceptions, cognitive functions, moods and motivations. Psychological disorder is a mental illness that develops abnormal patterns in the normal functioning of the brain. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM- V), is the most widely used system that sets criteria to determine and classify whether the pattern of behavioral or psychological symptoms can consider as disorders, such as: characteristics of symptoms and significant duration....   [tags: Schizophrenia, Mental disorder, Psychosis]

Term Papers
1718 words (4.9 pages)

Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders Essay

- For decades, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders has been a tool used for clinical assessments and the diagnoses of mental disorders. New editions and revised versions of the DSM either update or delete many classifications and/or the disorders within them, usually based on a consensus among mental health scientists. However, it seems as if some of the content of the DSM has a tenuous relationship with the concept of reliability and validity as it pertains to what is considered a disorder....   [tags: Mental disorder, Psychology]

Term Papers
1067 words (3 pages)

Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders Essay

- Since the first diagnosis of autism was made in 1943 by an psychiatrist named Kanner [1], the diagnostic criteria of autism ever since has been evolving over time in both clinical and research settings. One of the world’s most widely used classification handbook of mental disorders is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) proposed by the American Psychiatric Association. DSM has underwent 7 revisions since its first edition published in 1952. The latest edition, DSM-5, was released in May 2013....   [tags: Autism, Pervasive developmental disorder]

Term Papers
1201 words (3.4 pages)

Essay about The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

- Agoraphobia is derived from the Greek words agora, meaning “gathering place” or “assembly” which was used to describe a city’s marketplace, and phobia meaning “fear.” It literally means "fear of the marketplace." Carl Westphal first coined the term “agoraphobia” in 1871 to describe people who were afraid of large open spaces. Since then, the definition of agoraphobia has been modified and continues to develop as more research is done. (Barlow, 2002, p. 328) The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM–5; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013) defines the essential trait of agoraphobia as "marked, or intense, fear or anxiety triggered by the real or anticipat...   [tags: Panic Disorder, Homework]

Term Papers
1783 words (5.1 pages)

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Comparing DSM-IV and DSM-5,

- The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) has been used for decades as a guidebook for the diagnosis of mental disorders in clinical settings. As disorders and diagnoses evolve, new versions of the manual are published. This tends to happen every 10 years or so with the first manual (DSM-I) having been published in 1952. For the purpose of this discussion, we will look at the DSM-IV, which was published originally in 1994, and the latest version, DSM-5, that was published in May of 2013....   [tags: Manual of Mental Disorders]

Term Papers
2204 words (6.3 pages)

The Interpretation Of Schizophreni Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

- In this paper the literal interpretation of schizophrenia will be given; however the broader definition currently used in the healthcare field will be included to give a better understanding of the disorder. The criteria for diagnosis pertaining to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, the most recent being DSM-V will be included. Symptoms of the disorder and the physical changes in the brain will be explained to include a comparative image from a set of twins, one of which diagnosed schizophrenic and the other healthy....   [tags: Schizophrenia, Mental disorder, Psychology]

Term Papers
967 words (2.8 pages)

Sensory Processing Disorder : The Diagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disorders

-   Sensory Processing Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders “Our website, www.spdfoundation.net receives an average of 85,000 hits each day from individuals seeking information about this disorder, which shows how much information about the disorder is sought and needed. And although we are excluded even from the category of a diagnosis that needs further research, the challenges impacting our children live on and so do our families. Their needs are real and the importance of services is now magnified.” Sensory processing disorder is a neurological disorder which alters the way the brain manages and responds to sensory input....   [tags: Mental disorder, Psychology, Psychiatry, Neurology]

Term Papers
823 words (2.4 pages)