Deviations from the Morals of God in the Plays York: The Fall of the Angels and Chester: The Fall of Lucifer

Deviations from the Morals of God in the Plays York: The Fall of the Angels and Chester: The Fall of Lucifer

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York: the Fall of the Angels and Chester: the Fall of Lucifer
It is no doubt that the cause of the tortured condition of the state of affairs in the world today had to start somewhere. The universe which is created and governed by God can be a friendly habitat for humans as long as they follow their moral ideals. If there is a deviation from moral ideals, we can be sure that the forces of evil will find root in our thoughts and actions. Since ideals proceed from our minds, they become our own intentions. The two plays, York: the Fall of the Angels and Chester: the Fall of Lucifer are prime examples of deviation from God’s moral ideals and submitting to the forces of evil that are governed by pride and greed. Particular elements of pride and greed prevail in the character of Lucifer in both the plays. The question arises as to whether God, by creating for free will, created the evil intentions in Lucifer because of whom the angels also fall in the York play, or whether Lucifer’s intentions and his fall in the Chester play emanate from the perversion of his free will. The resolution to this question lies in the fact that the evil intentions in Lucifer, which accounts for the fall of the angels in the York play and his fall in the Chester play, prevail from Lucifer’s twisted intentions of pride and greed.
As soon as the plays begin, it becomes obvious that the relationship of Lucifer’s pride and greed exist in both the plays. Lucifer’s arrogance about his brightness and being named the “berar of lyghte” (line 38, p. 13) in the York play and his words “I ame wonderous brighte, amongst you all shininge full cleare” (lines 26-7, p. 18), in the Chester play, set the stage for Lucifer’s conceited ideas. Lucifer’s words reflect or for-tel...


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...te. However, the York play may provide a sense of shock and confusion for the audience because it will be hard to comprehend why Lucifer and his angels are forced to fall from heaven. Regardless of the reasons for Lucifer and his angels’ fall in the York play and Lucifer’s fall in the Chester play, the fundamental idea in both plays is that evil consists in perverted free-will and the influence of this perversion will rise to its highest value if the will is in conflict with conscience. Obligations towards others is important than obligations towards ourselves. Respect to our own selves obligates us to be faithful and renounce any self-deceit. Only then will we enter into a spiritual relationship with God. Unfortunately, in both the York and the Chester play, Lucifer chooses to serve his creative and perverted free-will by succumbing to its evil intentions.








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