The Declaration of the Rights of Women Essay

The Declaration of the Rights of Women Essay

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The French Revolution was a period of time in which France underwent many changes, many which could be considered revolutionary. France’s whole system and way of being was completely changed. New ideas were proposed everyday. An idea is revolutionary when it is a new idea, when it is something that has never been thought of before. The Declaration of the Rights of Women written by Olympe de Gouges on September 1791, was one of the ideas proposed to the National Assembly (Hunt, Web 1). The document proposed that since the French Revolution was all about finding equality for all people, women should be equal to men and therefore, should have the same rights as men did. Women at the time live in terrible conditions. They had little access to education, and therefore could not enter professional occupations that required advanced education, were legally deprived of the right to vote, and were not considered citizens (Class Discussion Notes). If equal rights were not given to women, the French Revolution had not reached its full potential, according to Gouges. She expressed this idea in her document, saying, “This revolution will only take effect when all women become fully aware of their deplorable condition, and of the rights they have lost in society” (Gouges, Web). Anyone that questioned the Revolution was immediately put to death (Class Discussion Notes). If Gouges’ document and ideas were important enough to catch the attention of the National Assembly and for her to be put to death, her ideas could be considered important and revolutionary (Britannica, Web 1) But, the document was not revolutionary. The Declaration of the Rights of Women was not a revolutionary document because its ideas were taken from other people and were no...


... middle of paper ...


..., Lynn:
Web 1: http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/293/
Web2: http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/295/

Book: The French Revolution and Human Rights: A brief documentary History-Lynn Hunt

Britannica:
Web 1:
"Olympia de Gouges." Encyclopaedia Britannica. Encyclopaedia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014. .
Web 2:
"Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de Condorcet." Encyclopaedia Britannica. Encyclopaedia Britannica Online Academic Edition. Encyclopædia Britannica Inc., 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014. .
Gouges:
Web: http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/293/
National Assembly:
Web: http://chnm.gmu.edu/revolution/d/295/

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