Essay on Debate for No More Refugees in Australia?

Essay on Debate for No More Refugees in Australia?

Length: 1891 words (5.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Asylum seekers, in particular “boat people” have proven to be a significant social issue, one that has prompted many intense debates in Australia over last twelve months. Australia has a long history of providing refuges a safe haven. However, in recent times, attitudes towards asylum seekers have become increasingly negative and at times hostile as asylum seekers are constantly portrayed as a threat to culture and society (Lynn & Lea 2003). This essay will provide a brief history of asylum seekers in Australia and examine the social structures that have contributed to the attitudes and treatment of asylum seekers in Australia today. The structures that will be explored are groups and the social institutions of mass media, government and law. A comparison of media reports, government rhetoric and facts around asylum seekers will be discussed and this paper will argue that the government, through media and policy (law) have heightened the threat of asylum seekers in Australia leading to negative attitudes and prejudice by the Australia public toward “boat people”. In addition, a range of sociological concepts and theories will be presented throughout the paper to support the argument.
Australia takes on many refugees annually, some of which come through the humanitarian program and others who arrive in Australia seeking asylum (Schweitzer et al 2005). The first asylum seekers arriving to Australia by boat was soon after the Vietnam War, with the first boat arriving in Darwin in 1976 (Phillips & Spinks 2013) . (Mann) reports that these asylum seekers were settled seamlessly into the community with the government providing generous access to accommodation and other settlement services. He suggested that due to Australia’s i...


... middle of paper ...


... the Australian public toward asylum seekers. The division of the “us” and “them” groups driven by the power of the Australian government through group think has led to that Australian public being persuaded that the best way to deal with the group is to exclude them from our community through detention. The division of the two groups is evidenced further through the media’s use of negative language and labelling of the asylum seekers to a point that creates hostility and prejudice against the group. Examples of how the government has used labelling and hegemony to influence the public opinion, has resulted in justification of the policy’s adopted to deal with the irregular maritime arrivals has been presented. It has been argued that through the rule of law this has created further separation of the groups, thus promoting resentment toward the asylum seekers.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay about The Myths And Struggles Of Australia 's National Identities

- ... For instance, they both celebrate the arrival of the first colonial fleet (the Australia day) and their independence from its mother country (the Anzac day). The government investigated generously on creating various legends to demonstrate Australians own national identities. The prevalent Anzac sprits are considered to be defined by Bean, and Bean consciously emphasized on the features that they considered are native born, such as the “bushmen”, “digger”, “egalitarianism”. Nowadays the prevalent Anzac legend serves as a symbol of Australian national identity and a useful tool created for the government as a function to display Australian’s unique traits....   [tags: Australia, Indigenous Australians, British people]

Better Essays
1269 words (3.6 pages)

Essay about The Human Rights Commission

- President of the Human Rights Commission, Gillian Triggs confers/confirms that ‘Australia is in breach of international law’ in relation to its practice of detaining the children of illegal immigrants. Immigration Detention has been a relevant political debate for some time now; the Liberal, Labor and Green parties are constantly outlining their policies on refugees, as it is an area, which contains potential for more voters. As Gillian Triggs notes, the current government is in breach of international law, however, the Liberal-National Coalition was voted in based on their policies outlined, including refugee policies....   [tags: Australia, Refugee, Human rights, Law]

Better Essays
1486 words (4.2 pages)

The Issue Of Refugees And Asylum Seekers Essay

- A preamble – including the definitions of ‘refugee’ and ‘asylum seeker’ in relation to Australian immigration policy Refugees and Asylum seekers are similar but not the same; a Refugee is “someone who is unable or unwilling to return to their own country because of a well founded fear of being persecuted because of their race, religion, opinion or membership of a certain social group”. Asylum seekers are people who have just claimed that they are a refugee; they must have their claims processed by the government of the country they are applying for asylum in....   [tags: Australia, Refugee, Immigration, Racism]

Better Essays
870 words (2.5 pages)

Refugee Asylum Seekers in Australia Essay

- Australia has had a long history of receiving individuals and groups who are seeking asylum as well as unfortunately a long history of turning those away who are perceived as different. (McKay,Thomas & Blood 2011).Even though the white Australia policy was abandoned decades ago it still lives on as a strong resonance in the conservative right of politics (Westoby & Ingamells, 2010). Community fear about Australia’s border seem easily triggered, which has prompted the term ‘paranoid nationalism’ to be used to describe the heightened refugee politics of the Howard years linked to discrimination and maltreatment of asylum seekers which still lives on today (Westoby & Ingamells, 2010)....   [tags: War Refugees Essays]

Better Essays
2331 words (6.7 pages)

The Differences Between Australian Public Representations Of The Refugees Before 1960 And Boat People ' After 1975

- ... This indicated in media, including television, magazine and in statements by members of parliament and in proposals acknowledged by the Returned Services League (RSL) and the Australian Natives Association (ANA) . Anti-Semitism activities including property damage, violence, verbal abuse occurred in Jewish concentrated areas in Melbourne and Sydney . This objection was a consequence of traditional prejudices and stereotypes against the Jews. They were labeled as agnostic people out to undermine Christianity ....   [tags: Refugee, Australia, World War II, Immigration]

Better Essays
881 words (2.5 pages)

Essay on Vietnamese Refugees in Orange County

- For years refugees have come to America from all over the globe coming from Syria, Vietnam, Iraq, and even Australia. A refugee is different than an immigrant, in such a way that they are basically forced to leave their country in order to escape war, persecution, or a natural disaster. Unlike immigrants who have been here for a long time like the Mexicans, or the Japanese, the Vietnamese have been in the U.S for around thirty years or less. After the Vietnam War, the Vietnamese feared for their life and were forced to leave their county for liberty....   [tags: War Refugees Essays]

Better Essays
995 words (2.8 pages)

Essay about Asylum Seekers And Official Refugees

- In this piece, I will argue that the social factors and attitudes surrounding the distinction of asylum seekers and official refugees, are constructed and exploited by the Australian Government, to improve their political and economic position over the nation. The Government uses nationalism and assimilation to maintain their power to shape the culture and normality of Australian society. They achieve this by influencing society through the media, to fear 'illegal ' asylum seekers, but accept those that fit the 1951 refugee convention criteria....   [tags: Refugee, Australia, Right of asylum]

Better Essays
1194 words (3.4 pages)

Essay on The Political Situation Of Australia

- Political Issues The political situation of Australia is known to be relatively stable. Based on reports released by The Economist Intelligence Unit, the country is one of the world’s most politically stable countries which directly translates to the ease of doing business in the country, low political corruption, and a high amount of government support for business related functions. In terms of corruption levels relative to other countries, Australia is ranked the 11th lowest according the Corruption Perception Index as of 2014, which is fairly close to Canada at 10th place ....   [tags: Australia, Culture of Australia, Gender, Refugee]

Better Essays
1239 words (3.5 pages)

The Impact of Refugees on a Society Essay examples

- The Impact of Refugees on a Society The argument that refugees have a negative effect on society has been a topic of great debate for many years, both in the UK and across many other countries. Almost since time began, the human race has had problems when the situation in their area has changed for the worse, and they have had to make tough decisions about where they should go next, and the problem has never been a more prominent issue than in today's society. It is an argument with two clearly defined sides....   [tags: War Refugees Essays]

Better Essays
1188 words (3.4 pages)

Essay on Burundi Refugees

- Refugees are people who have been forced to leave their home country for fear of persecution for reasons of race, religion, politics, civil war or due to environmental disasters. They move to other countries hoping to find help and asylum. Refugees do not include displaced persons who are people who have been forced to move within their own country. Over 80% of refugees are in developing countries due to the country being less able to help. They live in extreme poverty, lacking food, shelter, clothing, education and medical care....   [tags: War Refugees Essays]

Better Essays
501 words (1.4 pages)