Deaf Culture And The Deaf Essay

Deaf Culture And The Deaf Essay

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“Being deaf does not make you dumb, just as being hearing does not make you smart.” The author of this quote is unknown, but the concept behind these words is true in every aspect: hearing people do not know much about the Deaf culture. Our world is always quick to jump to conclusions when it comes to different people. This leads to many misconceptions and unknown realities about Deaf people and their way of life. So much is unknown about the Deaf world; for example, many do not know the qualifications for being deaf and the day to day activities deaf people can participate in. Everyone should be able to receive a chance to see inside the Deaf culture and be enlightened to the truth.
If one were to ask to describe what being deaf meant, most would say it was someone who simply could not hear. This is not always the case; there are numerous different levels of deafness. Someone with a hearing loss of twenty-one to forty decibels (dB) is considered to have mild deafness. With mild deafness, one might have trouble hearing in a room where there is a lot of noise without the assistance of hearing aids. The next level of hearing loss is forty-one to seventy dB, which is called moderate deafness. With the help of hearing aids, a person could perceive voices in a quiet room and detect loud noises. Seventy-one to ninety-five dB is referred to as severe deafness; hearing aids do little to help, but people could possibly hear sounds of a higher volume. If a person has a hearing loss greater than ninety-five dB, it is considered profound deafness. Those with profound deafness rely heavily on sign language and/or lip reading (Levels of Deafness). It is extremely rare for a person to be entirely deaf. In that case, the coc...


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...uctions to co-players (Scriver). Deaf athletes are no less qualified than any hearing athletes. All athletes, with disabilities or not, should be given equal fortuities to participate in the entertaining and competitive world of sports.

There are endless opportunities accessible to deaf people. Everyone outside of the Deaf community is blind to the fact that deaf people are just as capable of everyday activities as hearing people. The Hearing world expects deaf or hard of hearing people to have limitations when it comes to jobs, driving, talking, and sports. They also do not realize all the technology
that is useful in communicating to the Deaf community. The Hearing world can be so oblivious to the different cultures surrounding them. They are unaware of the complexity of being a part of the deaf culture and the strong bond of family in their society.




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