The Creation of Life Without God in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay

The Creation of Life Without God in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay

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What would happen if man created life without the help of woman or God? What happens when the creator rejects its own creation? Mary Shelley, in the timeless story of Frankenstein, explores these life altering questions. The idea of a human being self-created is so controversial and intriguing to readers that Frankenstein remains a popular novel nearly two centuries later after being written in 1823. This could mean Mary Shelley’s work is still teaching readers something about themselves and the contemporary world in which one lives. Shelley’s novel goes against all previous beliefs that woman, man, and God are involved in making new human life. Through the analyzation of a religious, critical lens, the idea of recreating man is not morally right in God’s eyes because it is unnatural, and humans are not Christ like. When looking at bringing the dead back to life with human capabilities the process is challenging even with the scientific advancements today. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, it is proved that man is not fit to be creator through the perspective of the various characters in the story and through the perspective of the reader.
What influenced Mary Shelley to question religion, creation and God? Looking at her personal life, one can find out why she brought up the controversial subject to begin with. Mary was the first and only child of William Godwin, the anarchist political philosopher, and Mary Wollstonecraft, the famous author of A Vindication of the Rights of Women. These two philosophical standouts were authors that held a very rebellious nature, in their time. The two were married only five months before Mary's birth, Wollstonecraft's pregnancy attracted a large amount of attention. Tragically, Mary Wollstonecr...


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...n the story, Victor creates the creature for his own good and does not give any glory to God. Ultimately, he wants others to idol him for his work. However, Victor is a sinner and, like all humans cannot be a God for that mere reason. Romans 3:23 says “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” Meaning, as long as we are sinners we will be incapable of being God or playing any of his roles. To conclude, Mary Shelley makes many parallels to God, Adam, and Satan in her novel Frankenstein. The lack of religion in her childhood could be the reason for the controversial topic that the world to this day is still fascinated with. However, throughout the story, it is proved that man is not fit to be a creator like God. The process of bringing the dead back to life is immoral in God’s eyes. As long as man is sinful, humans will be incapable of being a creator.

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