Crabbe by William Bell Essay

Crabbe by William Bell Essay

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Generally, adolescents feel as running away from home is a solution to all their problems. Most people think that running away from one’s problem leads to negative consequences, however, that is proven wrong, according to the novel Crabbe by William Bell. In the novel Crabbe by William Bell, 18-year-old Franklin Crabbe’s decision shows that running away is a considerable approach to solving one’s problems. He packs his bags and runs off into the woods in hopes of finding inner tranquility and freedom. Throughout his journey in the woods, Crabbe unexpectedly receives more than what he seeks for. In the woods, Crabbe receives great rewards such as quality moral support from a strong willed woman named Mary Pallas, he obtains many important survival skills, and he becomes an overall more responsible and mature person.


The first benefit Crabbe attains from his escape into the woods is improved surfeit knowledge for outdoor survival. In the beginning, Crabbe left plenty of sweets and spilled fish oil all over his tent floor (Bell 51). Later on in the novel, Crabbe shows immense improvement in outdoor survival when he successfully passes Mary’s “Big Test” (Bell 84). Also, Crabbe shows further improvement when he says “Better still, I got so I actually thought I could survive in the bush without Mary —on an elementary level — able to find food (vegetable, animal and fish), build shelters, make fires (even in the pouring rain), cook fairly edible meals” (Bell 95). These quotations show readers that Crabbe’s run into the woods allowed him to transform from an inexperienced, weakling to a stronger more experienced young adult. Therefore, Crabbe proves that running off and staying in the woods has made him gain more advanced outdoor skil...


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...ponsible person.

In summarization, running away from your problems is a great solution and can even be more beneficial than we expect, according to Franklin Crabbe in William Bell’s novel Crabbe. Franklin Crabbe, the protagonist, receives various benefits from his decision to run away from his problems. In the wilderness, Crabbe receives moral support from Mary Pallas, obtains many key survival skills, and develops into an overall more responsible and mature person. Although running away from home has its perks, the risks and cons need to be taken in for consideration as results may vary. The novel Crabbe by William Bell is an exquisite novel that teaches readers in life we will all face many obstacles in varying situations, but in the end it all is ultimately dependent on how we choose to tackle these situations.













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Crabbe by William Bell

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