The Conformity Of Society In Kate Chopin's The Awakening Essay

The Conformity Of Society In Kate Chopin's The Awakening Essay

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Topic # 5 By: Jason Garcia
The Awakening By: Kate Chopin





















We as Individuals all too easily become entrapped to the ideals set forth by society as we become antithetical to these expectations. Our souls are liberated from the chains that bind us to the broken system that is society. Throughout an awakening we can become disconcerted with what the balance between the person we want to become and the person society wants us to show. Only when we truly awaken from this slumber we call conformity can we truly rediscover ourselves and liberate ourselves from the things that bind us the things, that oppress us, and tortures us. In Kate Chopin’s novel “The Awakening” we’re introduced to Edna Pontellier as the novel’s sad heroine whose personality blurs and sharpens from minute to minute. In a time were women lived by an intricate system of social confinement Edna Pontellier is not content with conformity of despair and unfulfillment. It was at this interval of her life she finds herself unconnected with her children and frustrated with her husband Leonce, this fuels Edna’s awakening causes her to think more freely, paradoxical to the way women of her time thought. Throughout the course of Edna’s awakening she goes from conventionality to living on her intrinsic beliefs but as the thrill of the hunt fades she finds herself in an emotional wilderness.
The first phase of Edna’s awakening we see her breaking away from conventionality and start to live on her own intrinsic beliefs. For example, in the text “Mrs. Pontellier was beginning to realize her position in the universe as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world within and about her”. Kate Chopin uses Imagery to amplify how ...


... middle of paper ...


...g freedom.
Throughout this novel Kate Chopin rather marvelously emphasis on Edna’s awakening from conventionality to her awakening individuality to her beliefs becoming the catalyst of her downfall and eventually suicide. From her slowly starting to find her place as an individual in the world no longer seeing herself as just somebody’s wife or mother. From her standing up to her husband but also society telling her to back down, to her beliefs and social constraints becoming all to abstract for her time period. As individuals in society all too many times we become constricted by conformity more concerned with pleasing societal expectations than truly discovering our inner selves. Making Edna’s sacrifice more detrimental to true freedom from societies conformity only when she became one with the ocean’s vast infiniteness did she truly learn awaken.




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The Conformity Of Society In Kate Chopin's The Awakening Essay

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