Conflict Between Blanche And Stanley In A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

Conflict Between Blanche And Stanley In A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

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Conflict Between Blanche And Stanley In A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams

In Tennessee Williams play "A Streetcar Named Desire" two of the main characters Stanley and Blanche persistently oppose each other, their differences eventually spiral into Stanley's rape of Stella.
Stanley (Stella's husband) represents a theme of realism in the play; he is shown as a primitive, masculine character that is irresistible to Stella and on some levels even to his "opponent" Stella's sister Blanche.
Blanche who had been caring for a generation of dying relatives at Belle Reve has been forced to sell the family plantation. Blanche is a great deal less realistic than Stanley and lives in illusions which bring upon her downfall.
Conflict first arises when Blanche arrives at the Kowalski household and Stanley's authority over his home is questioned. Stanley has always had authority and control of his home and also his wife Stella. When Blanche arrives he feels that he is being invaded and doesn't agree with it. His "rat race" style of life doesn't match with Blanches but has somehow converted Stella. One of the main themes about conflict is that Stanley and Blanche are in a battle to win Stella and neither of them will give her up.
A particularly evident section of conflict in the play is over Belle Reve and Stanley's "Napoleonic code". Blanche has told the Kowalski's that she had lost Belle Reve but without proof suspicions arrive with Stanley "well, what in the hell was it then, give away? To charity?" Stella doesn't take the fact that Blanche has no papers regarding Belle Reve as meaningful as Stanley does. Stanley from a relatively poor background compared to Stella and Blanches Belle Reve plantation and now would appreciate a slice of their assets and speaks about the Napoleonic code meaning that everything that his wife owns, or part owns is also his. After riffling through Blanches belongings for information Stanley subtlety confronts her with "it looks like you raided some stylish shops in Paris."
The audience can sense that Williams has intended Stanley to question Blanche and for her to simply return his remarks with what seem like legitimate reasons "Why, those were a tribute from an admirer of mine." The conflict can only be increased because Stanley has not yet been able to dismantle Blanche and find the truth.
The conflict between Stanley and Stella climaxes in scene ten. In this scene Stanley openly takes Blanche apart piece by piece he begins with unenthusiastic comments such as "Swine huh?

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" "You did huh?" to Blanche's long bouts of speech in which she tries to redeem herself. Stanley secondly disproves Blanches tales about the millionaire "there isn't a goddam thing but imagination." Stanley then proceeds to rape Blanche. Stanley's final line before he grabs Blanche suggests that throughout their time together Stanley believed that he would overcome her "we've had this date with each other from the beginning."
It is apparent by the end of the play that Blanche has lost everything. It began firstly with relatives, Belle Reve moving onto her sanity and being raped, and finally ending with her at a mental institute as proposed by her sister Stella.
This can be seen through the symbolism used with the two conflicting characters. Blanche is described as arriving in a streetcar a small agile method of transport compared to Stanley's train-an unstoppable force that would take out anything in its way. This theme can also be transferred to the music used in the stage directions of the play. When "the blue piano" is used in the stage directions it is very much Stanley's situation where he is control compared to the "polka music" which is typically in the background when in correlation to Blanche. Another theme of sound that is used is the train which represents conflict or at least the beginning of conflict for example when Stanley enters his apartment unnoticed and overhears a conversation between Blanche and Stella. "Another train passes outside. Stanley hesitates, licking his lips, then he turns stealthily"
It seemed unlikely to me that Blanche would ever gain Stella from Stanley, though Stanley can be violent and abusive towards his wife she still remains, and still has her love for him maybe because he is simply irresistible or because she knows the better side of Stanley. This gives Stella no real reason to leave, especially to leave to be with a family member which she moved away from when she was young. Blanche came to the Kowalski's with no intentions, it is only because Blanche disproves of them together that she intends to take her sister back.
Audience's sympathies may change from Stanley at the beginning because of the invasion of an alien character living in his home to Blanche at the end because of her rape and mental state. Though Blanches ending may seem wrong, as is what Stanley did to her, she only educed who own demise.
The differences between Stanley and Blanche can be seen simply from what each character represents. Blanche represents "the old south", with dying traditions whilst Stanley represents "the new south" where chivalry no longer exists and it's every man for themselves. The new south inevitable overcomes the old south as times goes on just as Stanley over comes Blanche, a dying age.

From the beginning Stella and Stanley have had a strong, rigid relationship. One which no one could penetrate because of this structure Blanche underestimated Stanley and did not foresee the problems which eventually brought her downfall.
Because of this I believe that it was inevitable that Stanley would be seen as the victor between him and Blanche.
From the beginning Stella and Stanley have had a strong, rigid relationship. One which no one could penetrate because of this structure Blanche underestimated Stanley and did not foresee the problems which eventually brought her downfall.
Because of this I believe that it was inevitable that Stanley would be seen as the victor between him and Blanche
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