The Concept Of Childbearing Of Poor Women By Kathryn Edin And Maria Kefalas

The Concept Of Childbearing Of Poor Women By Kathryn Edin And Maria Kefalas

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In their article, Kathryn Edin and Maria Kefalas focus on the concept of childbearing in poor women and report the results they find from their 2 and a half year study of unmarried women. One of the most interesting concepts they noticed was that these women not only were conscious about their decisions, such as becoming pregnant at a young age or having children out of wedlock, but saw these decisions as being responsible. They explain this as follows: “The growing rarity of marriage among the poor, particularly prior to childbirth, has led some observers to claim that marriage has lost its meaning in low-income communities.” (Promises I Can Keep 11.2). Ultimately, it seems that individuals of the lower class have a very different perception of marriage than individuals of middle and upper class.
Perhaps the first thing one must consider is why there are increasing numbers of poor women having children out of wedlock. One explanation of this concept that Edin and Kefalas use is that the poor women view raising their own child as a sense of accomplishment. For instance, they exp...

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