Comparing St. Augustine's and Jonathan Edwards' Views on the Origin of Sin

Comparing St. Augustine's and Jonathan Edwards' Views on the Origin of Sin

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The origin of sin into the world is a theological topic that many theologians have expressed their views and thoughts. Of course, it is interesting for the theologians to guide the believers on how sin got into the world. This helps the believers in making cautious and informed decisions that may not lead them to wrong directions leading to sin. Although many theologians have given their views on this topic, my paper seeks to analyze comparatively the views of Saint Augustine and Jonathan Edwards.
Original sin has been given both biblical and traditional view and understanding. Its doctrine is very significant because it lays the playing ground upon which humanity stands before God. For sure, if the original sin is something trivial then the redemption work of Jesus Christ would have no meaning at all. It is sure that the fall of the first human beings, Adam and Eve, has a great bearing on the generations that came after. It is, therefore, too important to understand the state of mankind before the fall, the state after the fall following the consequences of sin.
St. Augustine is one of the ancient philosophers whose philosophical views imparted Neo-Platonism into Christian doctrines. He is associated with Catholic believers and is known for being the pioneer of “analogous argument” to oppose solipsism (Augustine, The City of God, 1972). According to Augustine, time is nothing but rather a mind-set of man's anxiety of the reality. He is one of the philosophers and theologians who have contributed significantly in the understanding of the original sin. Augustine’s view of original sin can be understood by analyzing his perception of the period before and after the fall of humanity.
Just like other believers, Augustine too believed ...


... middle of paper ...


... and humanity that came after him.
From the two sides of the argument, it is clear that both Jonathan Edward and Saint Augustine believed that the original sin had a direct effect on the prosperity of the whole race of man. All the generations were subject to condemnation and death due to the fall of the first man.



References
Augustine. (1961). Confessions . New York: Penguin Books.
Augustine. (1972). The City of God. New York: Penguin Books.
Hatch, N. a. (1988). Jonathan Edwards and the American Experience. New York : Oxford University Press.
Kimnach, W. C. (2009). Jonathan Edwards's 'Sinners In The Hands Of An Angry God. Yale University Press.
Otto, R. E. (1990). The Solidarity of Mankind in Jonathan Edwards' Doctrine of Original Sin . EQ62:3, 205-221.
Woo, B. H. (2014). Is God the Author of Sin?-Jonathan Edward's Theodicy . Puritan Reformed Journal 6 , 98–123.

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