Communism : A New Reality Of Communist Oppression Essay example

Communism : A New Reality Of Communist Oppression Essay example

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As Germany surrendered at the end of World War II, the Western powers planned the division of Europe and the withdrawal of their troops. Joseph Stalin, however, had other plans, fighting to install communist governments in the Eastern European countries and leaving his troops in the Eastern states. He had lived through two German invasions, and wanted to protect his country from future attacks. As tensions rose, the iron curtain fell across Europe, and many Eastern Europeans were shocked into a new reality of communist oppression. During the postwar period, Eastern European states’ criticisms of communism evolved from unrest over inequality, to dissatisfaction with the Communist Party’s oppression and control, and finally crystallized into disappointment in the ideology’s utter failure to meet the basic necessities of its population.
During the postwar period the Soviet Bloc’s newly baptized satellite states embraced communism’s triumph and sought to correct imbalances in the Communist government. Rather than reject the communist ideology, students during the Hungarian Revolution sought parity through reform. They drafted a list of demands for themselves and their country, requesting for “Complete economic and political equality with the Soviet Union,” and “The organization of Hungary’s economy on the basis of her actual resources” (Document 1). The students’ requests demonstrated the hypocrisy of the communist regime. The Soviet Union claimed to be a government for the proletariat, but in reality Russia’s oligarchy was overseeing the communist countries without any democratic input or decision-making. During the late 1950’s, Milovan Djilas published his book, The New Class, which illuminated the imbalance of power and privilege ...


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...iet Union’s area of influence dwindled, heralding the end of communism in Europe.
Although the Communist ideology had noble intentions, it failed in its execution because of corruption and incompetence in the bureaucratic class of the Communist Party. The Eastern European states had many critiques that matured over the course of the Cold War, starting with a frustration in the disparity of classes, to anger at the Communist bureaucracy, and finally a disillusionment of the Soviet Union’s failures to support the basic needs of its working class. The end of the Cold War and the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe was greatly accelerated by the Eastern Europeans who voiced their opinions on the state of Communism and its role in Eastern Europe. Russia could not provide for or competently lead its protectorates, and paid the price for biting off more than it could chew.

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