The Collapse Of The Soviet Union Essay example

The Collapse Of The Soviet Union Essay example

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The collapse of the U.S.S.R signaled the end of an era. The effects of the dissolution were felt all over the world, causing many international relationships to be completely re-evaluated (“Fall of the Soviet Union”, The Cold War Museum). Although the severe shift in the global political situation shocked many, the aftermath of the fall of the Soviet Union was felt most strongly in the countries which had been a part of it. The dissolution meant what had been one solidified nation was once again fifteen separate entities who must work to rebuild themselves in a new world. However, when we look at the former Soviet republics now, the disparity between their growth is obvious. Why is it that when faced with virtually the same situation some nations flourished and others struggled to compare?
Today when we look at the former Soviet republics we see a great range of status. Human rights and development, freedom of the press, and economic growth all vary greatly between the former republics. Many systems exist to help quantify and rate the various state of affairs in countries across the world.
A common way to estimate the status of a country is through it’s GDP, or gross domestic product. This simple comparison tool easily shows the economic difference between former Soviet republics. Estonia, in particular, rises high when comparing GDP per capita at a healthy $19,719.8, #33 in the world. Tajikistan, however, sits at a low GDP per capita of $1,099. The economic difference alone is amazingly large (“GDP per Capita”, The World Bank).
However, not all success can be rated purely economically. The well-being of a country’s citizens also play an important role in deciding how strong a country is. The Human Development Index summariz...


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... and living standards and cry that shock therapy was a mistake have failed to properly look into the statistics. The drop-off, he argues, was there before the dissolution of the Soviet Union. It’s not that unemployment and productivity have suddenly gotten worse, it’s that the skewed statistics of the Soviet Union are finally being corrected (Kraljic, 74).
The social issues each country faced also worked against their recovery. Estonia struggled to contain the growing tension between native Estonians and the remaining Russians, who dominated the urban areas (Iwaskiw, 31). Where Estonia barely managed to control the tension and calm those who continued to worry about the Russians taking over their country, Tajikistan fell almost immediately into a civil war. This civil war lasted until 1994, and made recovery during that time period virtually impossible (Curtis, 270).

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The Collapse Of The Soviet Union Essay example

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