The Classification Of Hispanic And How Ineffective It 's Become Through The Census Bureau Using Data And Research

The Classification Of Hispanic And How Ineffective It 's Become Through The Census Bureau Using Data And Research

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The way in which Hispanics have been classified has become too vague and many times perplexing. Hispanics can range from having fair skin, light eyes, and straight hair to dark skin, dark eyes, and coarse curly hair, and anywhere in between. Because Hispanics are diverse in their physical traits, Hispanics are difficult to taxonomize. This paper discusses the beginnings of the classification of Hispanics and how ineffective it’s become through the Census Bureau using data and research from the Pew Research Center and the United States Census Bureau. We focus on the classification of Hispanics because Hispanics have become the largest minority group within the United States at about 56 million in the nation’s total population. Before the 1970’s, Hispanics weren’t counted systematically in the United States within its population. It wasn’t until 1980 where Hispanics were categorized and listed on the Census, although, as an origin, not as a race.
However, the classification of Hispanics as become a challenge for the Census Bureau due to the reliance of individuals identifying themselves whether they are Hispanic or not. This paper addresses the relationship between the origin of the Hispanic category and the inefficiency of the classification of the Census Bureau by using research and statistics. The paper will first discuss the beginnings of the classification of Hispanics. It will use historical research to discuss how Hispanics began to be classified and the reasons for their categorization. The paper will then use research and statistics from the Pew Research Center and Census Bureau to discuss the challenges and inefficiency of the classification of Hispanics. The findings from all the research given will support the notion t...


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...keeping, as for the first time, respondents filled out their own racial designation on the census as opposed to census takers choosing it for them” (O 'Brien 7). “The 1980 census asked all Americans whether they were of ‘Spanish/Hispanic origin,’ and listed the same national-origin categories except for ‘Central or South American’” (Pew Research Center). However, the Hispanic category was and still considered to be an origin/ethnicity on the census, not a race. Hispanics can be any race. Starting from the 1990’s till present day, the census includes both race and Hispanic origin. The Census Bureau does not rely on the 1976 U.S. Congress law definition of Hispanics to count Hispanics but rather depends on the individuals identifying themselves whether they are Hispanic or not. The 2010 Census form asked about the “Hispanic” and race category question in this form:

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