Essay on Civilizations Occupying the New World

Essay on Civilizations Occupying the New World

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It would difficult, if not impossible, to understand this complex and revolutionary event without first firmly placing it within its historical context. We get to start in media res by thrilling to the phenomenal risks and intrepid exploits of the European explorers as they bet it all and dared to sail over the edge of the world where monsters be, only later to be appalled by the ruthless and bloody slaughter of the native people and the boundless greed that devoured gold as if from a slop trough and fettered, abused and exploited "lesser" beings for material gain and a desperate grasp for glory. But the anti-heroes in this tale did not spring fully formed from the head of Zeus, but rather were forged by some Iberian Vulcan in their centuries-long journey from ancient Rome and Carthage, through a dark collapse and subsequent subjugation to the enlightened nomadic followers of Allah, until finally united in Christian rule under the Reyes Catolicos, where they wrested their peninsula back from the infidels by drenching their arms in blood up to the elbow. Yet we cannot allow all this swashbuckling adventure to dampen the awe and majesty inspired by the incredible civilizations that occupied the New World before it was new, feelings that have not been significantly eroded by the merciless passage of the centuries. Finally, it would be folly to squander the lessons provided by this chapter in the story of our evolution to modern homo sapiens, a chapter whose foreshadowing murmurs reverberate and influence our existence even today, at times comforting us by showing how far we have come, but far too often reminding us of how we have never managed to truly lift ourselves from the primordial muck that, to our shame, human nature often is....


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...while it would take ages to finally abandon the preconceived notions of mythical beasts and the chauvinistic beliefs of superiority and difference. The detrimental side of these exchanges has almost become cliche, but it points to an emergent aspect of this society that was ill-prepared to deal with much of the pestilence that resulted: medicine was plagued by superstition and only nursed along by the teachings of ancients whose knowledge had managed to survive, but it was a science which was embarking on its on adventure of discovery that would help shape our ability to wage ware against our tiniest enemies, but many would suffer long before the journey had gotten very far. And medicine was not alone as many of the other technologies shared similar histories and found themselves at various states of advancement, from transportation to navigation to weaponry and more.

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