The Civil Rights Act Of America Essay

The Civil Rights Act Of America Essay

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America has become a melting pot of cultures, the country is very diverse and filled with lots of morals and values. Through the power of conversation Kwane Appiah and Kenji Yoshino expect society to respect and accept one another’s views. Conversation has the power to change a person’s opinion a certain topic. Both of them want the public to genuinely respect and understand each other’s values, not just because it is the law. Yoshino and Appiah want people to accept others based on morals and it would be socially unacceptable if they disagree with the matter. Civil rights functions like social practices because it forces people from all walks of life to be accepted, they no longer can be discriminated against. It is in place so society can “develop habits of coexistence” the Supreme Court created these laws in order for minorities to be treated equally (Appiah 71). The Civil Rights Act made society unauthentic, because behind closed doors people become their “true self” which means they do not necessarily agree with the laws in place. They just accept it because they do not want to be incarcerated or judged for being against the law. In Kwane Appiah and Kenji Yoshino’s essays they show how society must embrace the idea of assimilation and tolerance in order to coexist and lead to positive social change, while valuing conversation because it has the power to influence ones true self and who they pretend to be in the eyes of society.
The Supreme Court has seen many cases involving the issue of civil rights over the years, every case had a problem with something simple such as race, sexual orientation and gender. Mainstream society has labeled those who have qualities that are not seen as normal and have treated them differently. ...


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... 2015, the world is diverse and there are billions of people that are forced into groups because of certain characteristics. Despite Americans embracing the idea of assimilation Yoshino believes society has “this desire for authenticity, our common human wish to express ourselves without being impeded by unreasoning demands for conformity” (553). In other words a person should not let outsiders change their true self and they should embrace their values even when it goes against mainstream beliefs. Society needs to interact and accept one another despite their differences because no one on Earth is exactly the same, the only commonality is ethnicity and gender. Individuals should conform to the mainstream, but bring aspects of their true self with them. Sharing those values through conversation with the majority of society can create an open-minded and diverse world.

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