Civil Disobedience And Its Effect On Society Essay

Civil Disobedience And Its Effect On Society Essay

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As individuals, people believe they are allowed to fully practice Thoreau’s idea of Civil Disobedience to a certain extent. Growing up in today’s society people dislike the government and all the lousy rules rules and laws they enforce society with. Everyone is different in society, who you are now is determined by who you were around while growing up. People usually decide after adolescence, if you want to do what’s considered the right or wrong thing, this falls into his idea of civil disobedience. Through yourself as an individual, you get to decide what and what not to do. After a while no one is going to be beside you to mentor you and decide what’s right or wrong.
People are first going to do what they think is “right” rather than asking themselves or calling someone and asking them, “is this what the government wants society to do?” People are going to follow their own morals and continue to do what they want to do, whether the government thinks its right or wrong. That’s the whole point of civil disobedience, to disobey the law in a civil, non violent way. Do what you want in a civil way, but don’t go out breaking the law left and right. This will get you arrested, and that’s why people are allowed to do this to a certain extent.
A good example of civil disobedience in history is when Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat to a white person on December 1, 1995. Her act of civil disobedience not only was so bad to the public eye, it got her arrested. Although she got arrested, her bravery of not giving up her sit on the day that day aided and helped the civil rights movement as a whole. Which is why civil disobedience is such a profound way of getting change through unjust laws. She received many honors and awards be...


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...l lives. Its no one’s business but theirs as long as no one is getting hurt or is in harms way. When Thoreau said, “That government is best which governs not at all” (305). A society that believes in his civil disobedience idea would totally agree with his saying, because the government now should only protect society and its people from all the wrong doings and evil beings out there in the world and not interfere with other parts of our lives. When the government starts making laws that aren’t connected to our safety, which they already have and will continue to do so, it is taking away that they want to be the best type of government that they can be to their people, by not unnecessarily getting involved in our own personal lives. Doing that would really make people commit more acts of civil disobedience because the government wouldn’t be breathing down our necks.

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Civil Disobedience And Its Effect On Society Essay

- As individuals, people believe they are allowed to fully practice Thoreau’s idea of Civil Disobedience to a certain extent. Growing up in today’s society people dislike the government and all the lousy rules rules and laws they enforce society with. Everyone is different in society, who you are now is determined by who you were around while growing up. People usually decide after adolescence, if you want to do what’s considered the right or wrong thing, this falls into his idea of civil disobedience....   [tags: Law, Civil disobedience, Rosa Parks, Government]

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