Essay about Chinese Parents Vs. Asian American Children

Essay about Chinese Parents Vs. Asian American Children

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Most Chinese parents have a very low tolerance and satisfaction level, unlike American parents who tends to have a higher satisfaction level. You would believe that Chinese parents are looked at as uncaring parents, when they actually are caring parents. They’re not easy to be drawn by their child getting 70 on a test like a American parent would. Also in China and Japan they consider eye contact being very inappropriate in their culture. They believe that they should not be giving eye contact to their superior because it’s disrespectful.
In school, Asian students are known for being quiet and shy in class. Asian parents taught their children to always make eye contact with anyone who may be speaking to them, which in some cultures it is inappropriate for a child to do that. Most European American children are taught to value active classroom discussion and to look teachers directly in the eye to show respect, while their teachers view students ' participation as a sign of engagement and competence. (Bennett, 2003).
Eye contact is another way to communicate to others. Having good eye contact in the United States shows that you are aware about what’s going on and you are interested in what the person is saying. Also, when you are speaking to someone and your eyes are wondering or looking away from them it will let the person know that you are distracted or not listening. In some countries eye contact is not acceptable. In Middle Eastern cultures, Muslim, have rules regarding eye contact between men and women. Women should not give males eye contact due to respect. If you do give any eye contact it should only be for a brief moment.
European American parents are very involved in their children 's education. They take the time to ...


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... Halloween because they decorate streets with coffins, masks, and skulls. Americans celebrate Halloween but it’s just for spooky fun. Americans still do dress up and decorate the street with skulls, masks and ghost but in Mexico it’s a tradition and beliefs they believe in.
All cultures have very different unique and similar backgrounds. Some cultures have different beliefs in the education system and other has different ways on how they may celebrate a holiday but that’s okay. Everyone may not understand why certain cultures have certain beliefs but it’s not our job to judge them. Stereotyped by other people been going on for so long and sometimes it’s hard to have people think otherwise. All we can do as educators and parents is to accept them and set a example for the children so they could know that it is okay to learn things outside their culture and enjoy it.

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