The Children All Use Ksl ( Korean Sign Language ) Essay

The Children All Use Ksl ( Korean Sign Language ) Essay

Length: 872 words (2.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

When Kang starts his new job he notices that the children are very solemn and quiet. They don’t acknowledge him and try to avoid eye contact. Right away you notice that something is deeply wrong and is being covered up. The children are not acting like that out of respect for their teacher, but it is like they are afraid of him. The school has poor lighting and had bare plain walls with dark tones, it looked almost like a mental hospital. On the first day of teaching he has the children do a still life painting of some apples. A boy Min-Soo shows up to class late and notices that the child has bruises over his eyes. Kang was alarmed, but remained calm and left the boy alone because he knew that being late for class was not under his control. The children all use KSL (Korean Sign Language) which incorporates non-manual markers with lexical, syntactic, discourse, and affective functions which include frowning, head shaking, nodding, and leaning or shifting their torso (Ethnologue for Languages of the World, n.d.). The way the teacher interacted with the students showed his compassion toward the students by him using KSL as well to communicate. The inclusion of their hearing impairments into the movie provided an effective look into how the students in the real case lived and felt. They were isolated in Mujin and didn’t get to go outside of their school. They banded together as a strong community which used KSL to communicate and express themselves. Two girls in Kang’s class Yoo-Ri 's and Yeon-Doo are close friends who band. The actors used emotions while signing which accurately portrayed how individuals with hearing impairments use the language to express themselves.
Later at night while he was walking down the hall way he hears a...


... middle of paper ...


...ses to draw because she said that she is ugly because of her bruises on her face. He signs “That he thinks that she is beautiful inside and out and he promises to not draw the bruises.” When they draw each other he draws her smiling and she shows her drawing of him. She gives him bright sparkling eyes with a big smile which reflects how she sees him as a friend and comfort. The real Inhwa case that came to light in 2005 when the teacher alerted human rights groups and for that he was fired. The police didn’t begin the investigation until four months later, only after the former students talked to a national TV station testifying against the horrendous abuse that they had been hidden for years. The Gwangju city government and school board tossed the case back and forth, students and parents staged a sit in for eight months outside their offices, fighting for justice.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on To Sign, or Not to Sign

- In “The Day Language Came into My Life”, Helen Keller recalled the time she learned how to use sign language. As an infant, Helen had the ability to both see and hear, but at eighteen months old, she suffered from a severe illness that caused her to lose her seeing and hearing abilities, thus making her both blind and deaf. Three months before she turned seven, Helen’s parents hired Ms. Anne Sullivan to teach her sign language, and show Helen the world around her. Frustration ensued between Helen trying to learn sign language, and Ms....   [tags: Hellen Keller, sign language, communication]

Better Essays
711 words (2 pages)

The Development of American Sign Language Essay examples

- The development of American Sign Language in the United States dates back to as early as the 1600s. On Martha’s Vineyard there was a relatively large Deaf population due to genetics and heredity. This was thought to trace back to the first people of the land, who traveled from Massachusetts and carried this genetic deafness with them. Because there were so many people that were deaf living there, it was extremely common for all people, deaf and hearing, to learn their own version of sign language....   [tags: Sign Language History]

Better Essays
2932 words (8.4 pages)

Signs Of American Sign Language Essay

- American Sign Language has no exact origin but it is a visual language using hand movements, facial expressions and body language to communicate that is used by people that can’t hear. It is used predominantly by the deaf and people who can hear but cannot speak. Certain signs also represent complete ideas or phase’s not just individual word, not every word in sign language is signed. Sign Language is composed of a system that has conventional gestures using all your body parts, even spelling word out with your fingers....   [tags: Sign language, American Sign Language]

Better Essays
1048 words (3 pages)

Becoming A Sign Language Interpreter Essay

- When someone is introduced to something new, there are an assortment of different emotions that may come along with that; fear, sadness, anger, happiness and many others. Overwhelming joy and happiness were what I felt when my friend, Dalia, helped myself realize what I wanted to achieve in life, which is to become a sign language interpreter. Finding my path to a career I desired to pursue was a major stepping stone in my life and I will be forever grateful to Dalia for that. Dalia is the sweetest, most fun-loving, strong-willed person, I’ve known....   [tags: Sign language, Language, Linguistics, Sign]

Better Essays
958 words (2.7 pages)

The Signs Of American Sign Language Essay

- Reduplication occurs when the motions of a sign are bother shortened and repeated. Reduplication is one of the components that can differentiate a noun from a verb, such as the sign for the verb sit which uses one motion, as compared the noun chair which uses the same motion repeated twice. Reduplications varies from repetition in that reduplication carries grammatical meaning while repetition is used for clarification or carries a non-meaningful motion. Reduplication in sign language generally consists of repetition of the entire sign to convey the full meaning of the sign, repeating only part of the sign is almost completely useless because the meaning of the sign is lost when the characte...   [tags: Sign language, American Sign Language, Question]

Better Essays
1424 words (4.1 pages)

The History of the Sign for Addition Essay

- The earliest history of plus sign (+) we can trace is Egyptian hieroglyphic. The sign for addition was represented as a pair of legs walking in the direction of the text, neither left nor right . Because Egyptian could be written either from right to left or left to right. In Italy, the symbol plus (+) were adopted by the astronomer Christopher Clavius. The first person who may have used the plus (+) sign as an abbreviation was the astronomer Nicole Oresme’s, the author of the book” The Book of the Sky and the World” in 14th century....   [tags: plus, addition, sign]

Better Essays
910 words (2.6 pages)

Visual Language And American Sign Language Essay

- Visual language as such as sign language is the concept of gesture, body language, facial expression, and movement. Sign languages had many different languages in the world; for example, Mexican Sign Language, Japanese Sign Language, Chinese Sign Language, langue des signes Francaise, American sign language, etc. In the present day, million Deaf Americans use American Sign Language to use communicate each other as a visual language in anywhere includes America, Canada, and some countries. It is not audio language, but it is an official languages recognized since 1988 by the government due issue of Deaf President Now for protest by Gallaudet students and Deaf people at capitol hill and Gallau...   [tags: Sign language, American Sign Language]

Better Essays
1631 words (4.7 pages)

Conversations And Literature Of American Sign Language Essay

- Conversations and Literature in American Sign Language Introduction Need. Need. Need. Thus begins the poem “Need” by Peter Cook and Kenny Lerner, a Deaf and hearing poet, respectively. In a social commentary about our dependence on oil, Cook repeats the sign for “need” (an X hand that flicks forward, away from the chest) before slowly becoming a moving image that looks similar to a drill pumping oil from the ground. This use of a specific handshape to represent an idea is the basis of American Sign Language....   [tags: American Sign Language, Sign language, Linguistics]

Better Essays
1045 words (3 pages)

Essay about Uses of Fingerspelling and American Sign Language

- American Sign Language is the visual language that has been created by the deaf in this country. For those with a limited knowledge of deaf culture or American Sign Language (ASL), fingerspelling may be a foreign concept. Fingerspelling is the act of using the manual alphabet of ASL to spell a word or phrase. All fingerspelling is done with the dominant hand, as are one-handed signs, and is ideally done in the area between the shoulder and the chin on the same side as the dominant hand. This skill serves many purposes and functions in ASL conversation....   [tags: sign language, deaf, fingerspelling]

Better Essays
1225 words (3.5 pages)

Essay about Native American Sign Language

- Native American Sign Language Very basic, elementary and logical characteristics made the Native American Sign Language the world's most easily learned language. It was America's first and only universal language. The necessity for intercommunication between Indian tribes having different vocal speech developed gesture speech or sign language (Clark; pg. 11). Although there is no record or era dating the use of sign language, American Indian people have communicated with Indian Sign Language for thousands of years....   [tags: Native Americans Sign Language Communication]

Better Essays
1455 words (4.2 pages)