Child Poverty And The United States Essay

Child Poverty And The United States Essay

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Poverty has been an issue in the United States for over fifty years. As a way to prevent another Great Depression, Roosevelt came up with several policies to combat poverty, as well as create social net to help people in need. However, in all the time since the issue on poverty became a majorly debated in the government, and they have tried to make a significant change, the gap between the poor and wealthy only keeps increasing. There are several policies in trying to make a difference, and there are many different sub-divisions that fall in the poverty policy clause. This paper will be focusing on child poverty and the affects/repercussions that happen because of this problem; and how policies such as the Hamilton Project, and The Children’s Defense Fund Leave No Child Behind have been trying to come up with new ideas on how to deal with the issue.
The Great Depression was a hard and trivial time for the United States and its people, but out of it came an important lesson: to always have a system that helps all citizens, from the poorest to the richest. The depression began in 1929 when the stock market crashed. This event would become “the deepest and longest-lasting economic downturn in the history of the Western industrialized world,” and by 1933 there would be about 13 to 15 million unemployed Americans. The country started to find relief from this catastrophic event when President Franklin D. Roosevelt he presented the New Deal, which was a series of legislative policies aimed to prevent another Great Depression. Perhaps the most important, at least for the purposes of this paper, was in 1935 when “Congress passed the Social Security Act, which for the first time provided Americans with unemployment, disability and pensions ...


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...ust be addressed because in the famous Nelson Mandela, “Children are our greatest treasure. They are our future.” (Mandala) In other words, it is the duty of a country to ensure that its children have the best resources available to them.
Today, however, according to the National Center for Children in Poverty, there are “More than 16 million children in the United States – 22% of all children – live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level – $23,550 a year for a family of four.” (NCCP) This means that 22% of our future is at risk of not becoming all they can potentially become because they are not provided with the help they need. Several attempts have been made that try to make an impact in changing the vicious cycle that is poverty. In Paul Tough’s book, Whatever It Takes, he mentions Geoffrey Canada’s mission to help children who live in poverty.

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Child Poverty And The United States Essay

- Poverty has been an issue in the United States for over fifty years. As a way to prevent another Great Depression, Roosevelt came up with several policies to combat poverty, as well as create social net to help people in need. However, in all the time since the issue on poverty became a majorly debated in the government, and they have tried to make a significant change, the gap between the poor and wealthy only keeps increasing. There are several policies in trying to make a difference, and there are many different sub-divisions that fall in the poverty policy clause....   [tags: United States, Unemployment, Poverty, New Deal]

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