Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears Essays

Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears Essays

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Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears

What made the Cherokee culture distinctive towards others in the Trail of Tears time period was that they had a more peaceful, harmless outlook on the situation. In 1814, Andrew Jackson who would eventually become the President of the United States, had his and his whole army’s lives on the line in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend to the British forces when the Cherokee allied with them to win the battle. Surprisingly, 16 years later when Jackson was President of the United States, he made the deciding decision on the controversy of whether or not the Cherokee deserved their land. Jackson completed the Indian Removal Act in 1830, sending the Cherokee out of their own land which they rightfully owned, into several states. There were four routes: a water route, a land route, and two other major routes. The water route lead through Arkansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, back through Tennessee and Mississippi, Alabama, and then finally back again to Tennessee. The land route lead through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, and Tennessee. The first major route lead through Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, and Alabama. The second major route lead through Arkansas and Tennessee.
On that journey, it was believed that over 4,000 died of starvation! While the Cherokee had a lot to go through a tough time, they still had a peaceful look on America. The other tribes involved in the Trail of Tears constantly grieved over the loss of their only source of civilization, while the Cherokee made the best of the situation. The long Trail of Tears lead through moist valleys, many major waterways, plains, and forests. There were many resources for the Cherokee to use to ...


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...ieved that it was justice to act off of vengeful thoughts towards their enemies. The Cherokee’s decision making was also distinct based on how they chose to walk the trail, think about others, and act upon their thoughts. While the others didn’t believe in peace, and even weren’t peaceful to each other at times. The final example of my reasons of distinction is their attitude. The attitude of the Cherokee was a positive attitude where they would rejoice for the little things, and look forward to things getting better instead of focusing on the bad times that would be present with them. The rest of the tribes felt differently and believed that if they were displeased, then they had to fix it by trying to force a situation to change. That is why the Cherokee were distinct to the other tribes involved in the Trail of Tears.



Works Cited

Cherokee.org Wikipedia.com

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