Cherokee Medicine: The Medicine Wheel Essay example

Cherokee Medicine: The Medicine Wheel Essay example

Length: 1426 words (4.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Interconnectedness is a theme that flows throughout all aspects of Cherokee culture from spirituality to medicine, as they believe everything within the world is related. They believe spiritual energy courses through all components of the universe that influence their daily life and maintaining a balance between these energies is crucial to being in harmony with Mother Nature and living a fulfilling life. Rather than having a dominant species, group or society, all components of the world are considered to be equal and to have a purposeful role.1 Given this perspective, the Cherokee believe they can learn about health and medicine from plants, survival tactics from animals, and spirit freedom from birds. Due to this relationship, it is their duty to respect and revere the continuous flow of energy within the universe as they consider themselves to be brought to this earth as the keepers of Mother Nature.2
Similar to the concept of a continuous flow or cycle of energy, circles are symbolic in Native American cultures. In Native American cultures that live in teepees, such as the Lakota people, the round bottom indicates a person is in touch with the world and at peace with himself.3 In Cherokee medicine, the term “spirit” refers to an active flow of energy that connects all individuals to the “Universal Spirit.” In Cherokee culture; rituals, magic work, and ceremonies are conducted within these sacred circles with fire placed in the middle. The fire in the center is known as the Universal Circle and serves as a reminder to seek harmony and balance. It is considered to be the path to the Great One (a supreme energy being) and the beginning for all living things. In the Cherokee’s eyes, the universe operates in a circular fashion wh...


... middle of paper ...


...n order to facilitate movement and help elongate shortened muscles with success. In homeopathic medicine, people are beginning to recognize the usefulness of natural supplements and herbs to assist in treatment. The most notable difference in American versus Cherokee medicine is these types of treatment are considered to be adjunct treatment instead of primary when utilized in Cherokee medicine. Even though Cherokee medicine is often brushed aside as superstitious and considered inferior to Americanized medicine, I believe that we may have something to learn from the Cherokee medicine way. Cherokee medicine has proven to be very successful in its ability to cure various illnesses and disease in addition to improving one's quality of life. We speak of, “treating the whole patient,” but if we don’t consider their mind or spirituality, how can we claim to be doing so?

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Cherokee Medicine: The Medicine Wheel Essay example

- Interconnectedness is a theme that flows throughout all aspects of Cherokee culture from spirituality to medicine, as they believe everything within the world is related. They believe spiritual energy courses through all components of the universe that influence their daily life and maintaining a balance between these energies is crucial to being in harmony with Mother Nature and living a fulfilling life. Rather than having a dominant species, group or society, all components of the world are considered to be equal and to have a purposeful role.1 Given this perspective, the Cherokee believe they can learn about health and medicine from plants, survival tactics from animals, and spirit freedo...   [tags: interconnectedness, herbal remedies]

Powerful Essays
1426 words (4.1 pages)

The Strengths and Weaknesses Within My Medicine Wheel Essay

- Introduction In Aboriginal teachings, the medicine wheel is sacred because it represents the various components of a healthy, well-rounded individual. Like wellness, the medicine wheel represents an “active state of health in which an individual progresses toward a higher level of functioning, thus achieving an optimum balance” (as cited in Fain & Lewis, 2002, p. 7). The medicine wheel is divided into four major sections, each representing a major part of a person (physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual)....   [tags: Medicine Wheel ]

Powerful Essays
2025 words (5.8 pages)

Essay about Cherokee Medicine : The Purity And Wellbeing Of The Soul

- Cherokee medicine primarily focuses on the purity and wellbeing of the soul and assesses the physiological condition of the body as a secondary practice (Frazier, Goad, & Wolyniak, 2013). This holistic approach of healthcare benefits may be physical, emotional or spiritual. The Cherokee tribe combine numerous traditional Native American healing rituals including prayer, herbs, smudging, chanting, massage, counseling, harmonizing with nature, taking hallucinogens and ceremony (Lewis, n.d.). The combination of multiple healing techniques illustrates the Cherokee’s philosophy of medicinally treating an illness does not result solely from ingesting the plant or medicine, but from the delivery...   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

Powerful Essays
874 words (2.5 pages)

The Native Medicine Wheel Essays

- The Native Medicine Wheel is spiritual energy; it is a wheel of protection. There are four different colors on the wheel Red, Black, Yellow, and White. Each color represents something, air, water, fire, earth. Ancient stone structures of Medicine wheels can be found in southern Canada, South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana. The center of the medicine wheel represents the creator and the spokes represent symbolic signs that are different to each tribe whoever constructed that wheel knows the unique signs....   [tags: Native Americans]

Powerful Essays
926 words (2.6 pages)

Essay on Cherokee Women And Trail Of Tears

- Unconcerned about the legitimacy of their actions, European colonisers took lands unjustifiably from indigenous people and put original inhabitants who had lived on the land for centuries in misery. The United States also shared similarities in dealing with native people like its distant friends in Europe. Besides the cession of vast lands, the federal government of the United States showed no pity, nor repentance for the poor Cherokee people. Theda Perdue, the author of “Cherokee Women and Trail of Tears,” unfolds the scroll of history of Cherokee nation’s resistance against the United States by analyzing the character of women in the society, criticizes that American government traumatized...   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
802 words (2.3 pages)

Essay about The Culture And Identity Of The Cherokee Tribe

- When a person today thinks of Native Americans, the immediate image that emerges in one’s mind is the ‘typical Indian’, a person wearing a headdress of vibrant feathers and whom lives in a teepee. However, for members of the Cherokee Tribe this depiction could not be further from the truth or more offensive to the people of today or those who came before them (speakers). Throughout the book Blood Politics, Circe Sturm seeks to allow those outside the tribe to see the true race, culture and identity of the Cherokee people as both the past and present are explored....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
1481 words (4.2 pages)

History of Cherokee Culture and Food Essay

- Before there was a United States of America, there were tribes of Native Americans living off the land. In the southeastern part of the country, the largest group of Native Americans were the Cherokee people (Boulware, 2009). Cherokees are networked through vast kinship lines that separates them from other tribes in the region (Boulware, 2009). They once occupied a territory that ran throughout the Appalachian Mountains (Boulware, 2009). Cherokees spoke a common language known as Iroquoian, different from the surrounding tribes (Boulware, 2009)....   [tags: Native Americans, Cherokee Indians Essays]

Powerful Essays
2157 words (6.2 pages)

Native Americans And The Cherokee Indians Essay

- Sabrina Caldwell Laura Baker October 25, 2015 Cherokee Removal As Americans sought to expand their settlements into Cherokee land, the Cherokee faced three choices: assimilate, leave their native land, or defend their sovereignty. The Cherokee Indians had lived on these lands of thousands of years before the colonist claimed it for the United States. Five million acres of land in Georgia was trying to be peaceably obtained from the Indians. The Cherokee Indians having already given portions of their lands in numerous Georgia treaties wanted to hold onto what little land they had left....   [tags: Native Americans in the United States, Cherokee]

Powerful Essays
1027 words (2.9 pages)

Essay on John Ross And The Cherokee

- John Ross and the Cherokee. What is a leader. According to the dictionary a leader is a "person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country." (Merriam Webster) Though that may be what the term leader is defined by, one would assume that it takes much more to be considered a "good" one. A leader, is in many cases the voice of the people, he is the one whom everyone looks to in a time of panic, the one whom the people entrust to make the hard decisions and the one whom is supposed to value his constituents wants and need....   [tags: Cherokee, Native Americans in the United States]

Powerful Essays
2252 words (6.4 pages)

Essay on Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time

- Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time “The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend. Legend fades to myth, and even myth is long forgotten when the Age that gave it birth comes again. In one Age, called the Third Age by some, an Age yet to come, an Age long past, a wind rose in the Mountains of Mist. The wind was not the beginning. There are neither beginnings nor endings to the turning of the Wheel of Time. But it was a beginning.” (Jordan, 1). In the world of Robert Jordan’s bestselling fantasy series, "The Wheel of Time", the life of the ordinary people has been undergoing some extraordinary changes....   [tags: Robert Jordan Wheel of Time]

Free Essays
6164 words (17.6 pages)