Characteristics of Both Modern-Day and Traditional Childhood Essay example

Characteristics of Both Modern-Day and Traditional Childhood Essay example

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This essay will aim to examine how childhoods have continued to evolve through out the centuries. To do this, characteristics of both modern-day and traditional childhood through three different aspects will be discussed. The first aspect centred on is how the many childhoods vary, influenced by class, gender, race, geography as well as place within the family unit. The second aspect deals with the contribution the family and its variants have on the children’s life, with the added input of both various cultures and community. Thirdly the way a child is able to be involved in and influence their own childhood will be discussed. This has changed especially since the Children Act “Rights of the child” (1989), allowing consideration to be taken into the child’s feelings and wishes in all things.
Traditionally, childhoods were found to be shorter by either poor health resulting in death, or by the need to work in the factories with little or no schooling. Modern-day research shows this to be very different with the 1989 Children Act bringing into force the right of every individual child to have a healthier, safe and educated life.
However, the child and the way he/she will experience childhood differs from child to child. This in many ways is predetermined from the moment the child is born, the position and situation of their family, with the experiences they face daily; from neglect to indulgence, abuse to security, and poverty to affluence. The experience could be one of loss of a parent or close family member or the sheer fear as a natural disaster affects their environment. However, having strong social links with networks of family and friends, being a member of a club or group, and feeling safe in the neighbourhood all offe...


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... resulted in early signs now being noticed and action taken.
In conclusion, statistics show depravation and poor living conditions, along with extreme dangers faced by many children at the hand of their carers are on the increase. Pressures of the adult world have in many ways been shown to filter down into childhood with the increase cases of depression in young children.
Yet it can be seen that legislation and provision for the individual child is in place with safety and education at the heart. The child of modern-times has provision for better health with better screening and immunisation which considerably lengthens their life span. The family unit is still very much part of the child’s life though moulded by social change and cultural differences. The child has the right to express individual thoughts and feelings when dealing with life changing outcomes.

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