Chapter 7 Of The Lucifer Effect Essay

Chapter 7 Of The Lucifer Effect Essay

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In Chapter 7 of The Lucifer Effect, Zimbardo uses a form of logos called inductive reasoning as means to present a conclusion based from his observations in the experiment. He present this, when he writes, “Role playing has become role internalization; the actors have assumed the characters and identities of their fictional roles” (Zimbardo). In particular, he draws from specific examples of the participants’ behavior, and concludes the subsequent changes in behavior as the byproduct of role internalization. As described, the participants have become so engrossed in their roles, they have literally become the characters themselves. This fulfills the logical appeal as he uses specific cases in order to illustrate a generalization. Furthermore, Zimbardo uses ethos in order to demonstrate credibility. For instance, he presents this in Chapter 8, when he recalls in the words of Christiana, “In August of 1971, I had just completed my doctorate at Stanford University … and was preparing to start my new job as an assistant professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley” (Zimbaro). He portrays Christiana as a credible and reliable individual, and one who is knowledge in the psychological practice. As a result, any perspective that Christiana may argue for or against can be seen as justifiable and legitimate. Thus, the audience should see Christiana as a valid source for information. In Chapter 8, Zimbardo also uses a form of pathos, when he presents a quote from Christiana, in which he writes, “What you are doing to those boys is a terrible thing!” (Zimbardo). From the above quotation, Christiana’s statement explicates on the ethical and current standing of the experiment. Her words appeal to the emotions of the audien...


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...he cost of prescription drugs. Many pharmaceutical companies create a monopoly on the basis of patent laws over specific drugs. Subsequently, these companies are able to set high prices in order to maximize profit margins. While this may be beneficial for the pharmaceutical industry, patients are affected by those high costs as many are unable to afford these substantial prices, and are unable to receive the necessary treatment. To add insult to injury, protests against unaffordable drug prices are often disregarded and unheard by the media and even governmental institutions. In short, this presents itself as a power struggle on the profit for pharmaceutical companies and the rights for affordable prescription drugs. Evidently, as of now in the US, the prisoners are the pharmaceutical industry, where those in a high position are able to profit off of the patients.

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