Changes to Bernard Marx Through the Progression of Brave New World by Huxley

Changes to Bernard Marx Through the Progression of Brave New World by Huxley

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Bernard Marx is an intriguing character in the book Brave New World. At the beginning of the book, he is a very main character, but as the book goes on he is put more and more into the background of the story. The reason for this can be explained by the way his character changes as the book progresses. Aldous Huxley makes an interesting point by showing how a person can be changed by obtaining something he desires. It makes the readers wonder whether success would change them in the same way or if they would be able to maintain their character.
In the beginning of Brave New World, Bernard is very easily relatable for a high school reader. He doesn’t fit in with everyone else and for this he is insecure. One reason he doesn’t fit in is because of his size. Many people look down on Bernard because of his physical handicap of being just 8 centimeters shorter than the normal alpha. For this, he gets picked on by the others. Huxley said this when describing Bernard, “The mockery made him feel an outsider; and feeling an outsider he behaved like one, which increased the prejudice against him and intensified the contempt and hostility aroused by his physical defects. Which in turn increased his sense of being alien and alone.” Many people can relate to feeling inadequate or being a little different than everyone else so they feel like they can relate to Bernard. Therefore, they hope for the best for Bernard. Everyone likes an underdog. Readers want to see Bernard succeed.
In spite of Bernard’s height issue, he is not a timid character. He is not afraid to state his opinions on matters or to stand up for what he believes is wrong. Since Bernard does not truly belong in the Brave New World’s society as he would like, he can more eas...


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...ped forward again; then again thought better of it, and was standing in an agony of humiliated indecision.” This is when the readers realize how truly hollow he is inside. Bernard has become a coward. All the things he seemed to stand for, he only stood for to compensate for the fact that he didn’t truly fit in with society. It seemed as if he didn’t care about not fitting in, but when he finally does become accepted we see his little act of rebellion was a façade to cover his desire to be accepted. Huxley is trying to show how a person can be changed by achieving something they desire. People hope they would be able to maintain their values when they attain their desires. But, sadly, values are forgotten all too often in the midst of a person’s “success”.




Works Cited

Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. Print.

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