Changes Throughout The Land : Indians, Colonists, And The Ecology Of New England

Changes Throughout The Land : Indians, Colonists, And The Ecology Of New England

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The book Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon tends to generally explain how and why changes took place within the New England communities, affecting plants, animals and the people of its community and, and how these changes seemed to inter affect each other, all due to changes from an Indian to an European style of dominance. This seemed to show overall that the ecological system could be affected by changes the people within it may make. Which tends to bring Cronon’s thesis to light being the shift from Indian to European influence in New England was due to vital changes that constituted the way its people seemed to organize and reorganize their lives within the communities.

Although New England’s climate and its seasonal cycle remained similar to that of England. Early descriptions of the kind of environment the settlers encountered were mostly at the coastline area. The settlers were surprised with what they saw. They figured out on the overall that the New England was so endowed with natural resources like untamed animal and plant life. New England possessed thick forests that seemed abnormal to the settlers because back in England, there were hardly landscapes like this, since most forests where exhausted from the use of its timber as fuel. There was also the absence of domestic animals which looked weird to the settlers. This ended up being a determinant factor in how New England practiced agriculture.
The New England settlers still remained shocked at the fact that the Indians looked poverty stricken notwithstanding the surplus in abundance of these natural resources. As values towards life for both Indians and European settlers varied, it seemed to affect the op...


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... economical or environmental: dandelion, the fence, the arrival of pigs etc was just an eye opener to to bring to light the complex process and changes brought about due to the arrival of the Europeans to America. Meanwhile these complex changes and in general the European colonization cannot be well understood except through understanding the effects of New England Indians and Europeans on their ecosystem. The book also goes on to show the genesis of the environmental problems of New England eg erosions, deforestation, and climate changes; which are but of a few factors we still have to deal with till today. This book indeed acomplish the authors thesis. I recommend this book because it seems to really prove how what the present generation does today may affect the our environment, the next generation or future; a good example being the talk about climate change.

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