Catholicism Exposed in The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Essay

Catholicism Exposed in The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Essay

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Traditions are something that are passed from generation to generation. Tradition becomes a part of who we are as a scociety. Shirley Jackson mocks society’s way of blindly following certain traditions. Characteristics of Jackson’s story create a parallel with Catholicism, by harping on our fear of change but our ability to manipulate what we want from our traditions and the basis of Catholicism’s belief of the innocence in children. Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery" has created a clear link to Catholicism encouraging us to open our eyes and question our blind faith in traditions.
The Catholic religion has been practiced for centuries lasting through Crusades and every Easter holiday, Shirley Jackson uses this longstanding tradition to link her characters to the Catholic religion, because regardless of how bizarre this tradition may seem, it stands the test of time. Through her characters Shirley Jackson shows their reluctance to give up the lottery showing society’s fear of change. This fear of change is seen primarily through Old Man Warner. He has seen over seventy-seven lotteries and believes that without one everything will be different. When someone says that other villages have given up the lottery Old Man Warner exclaims that there is “nothing but trouble in that, pack of young fools” (Jackson 368). By calling them young fools, Old Man Warner is criticizing them for changing something that has always been. For a character to know nothing but the lottery for their whole life, changing something as big as this tradition could be dire to their civilization. The Catholic religion has been active for centuries and passed from family. When Catholicism is practiced in a family, children start going to chur...


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...h religion and in the lottery.
Religion and the lottery are two concepts of our society and Jackson’s fictional society that are just blindly followed. Shirley Jackson wrote this story to force society to ask themselves why do they follow such traditions. These traditions exist because they have been around forever. Blind faith is exactly what all of her characters in “The Lottery” are doing and what Catholics have in the face of Jesus. The “Lottery” maybe for heavier crops in the month of June (Jackson 368). While the Catholic religion is for a higher faith and ending. This is how Shirley Jackson takes society’s way is forcing us to open our eyes. She wants us to understand the parallels and do something positive and learn form what goes on. Things may not have the same brutal ending, but if they have no rhyme or reason what is our cause for believing.

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