The Catcher in the Rye Should be Included in the Curriculum Essay

The Catcher in the Rye Should be Included in the Curriculum Essay

Length: 1097 words (3.1 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

For many years people have argued about the inclusion of The Cather in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger in the high school english curriculum. This is such due to the inappropriate and adult oriented themes within If considered, many times within the novel the main character will face situations in which that the negative and vulgar themes will blossom into something meaningful that the reader can benefit from as a person and as a student. While the vulgarity and adult themes in The Catcher in the Rye are indeed inappropriate for adolescent students, ultimately its underlying themes of self discovery and possessing moral values provides life and ethical lessons that can be applied in the classroom as well as on a daily basis and therefore, the novel should be included in the high school curriculum for students to learn.
The discontent about The Cather in the Rye is due to vulgar language and sexual themes within the novel. The vulgar and inappropriate content does not prevent the reader from comprehending themes, symbols, and lessons and underlying meaning of the novel. In the novel, the main character, Holden, goes through many experiences that are deemed as inappropriate and are evident to the reader. But once the reader searches and analyzes the underlying meaning of the novel and situations and how Holden reacts to these situations, there is a great deal of redeeming and positive value from the novel. This then further supports the themes and symbols presented in the novel. While people may see the main character as someone who is dimwitted and possesses no ethical standards, he faces such scenarios which put that to the test and prove it wrong. And from that, students can learn the theme of individuality and coming of age. In ...


... middle of paper ...


...ture as well as their views on life and personal happenings.



Works Cited

1. “Somebody’d written “F*** you” on the wall” (Salinger, 260) Salinger, J. D. The catcher in the rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951.
2. “I hardly even had the guts to rub it off the wall with my hand…But I rubbed it off anyway.” (Salinger, 261) Salinger, J. D. The catcher in the rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951.
3. “I sat down…and offered her a cigarette…I felt much more depressed than sexy…Honest to God, I’ll pay you and all, but do you mind very much if we don’t do it?” (Salinger, 123-125) Salinger, J. D. The catcher in the rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951.
4. “My hunting hat really gave me quite a lot of protection…but I got soaked anyway…I didn’t care though. I felt so damn happy all of a sudden.” (Salinger, 275)
Salinger, J. D. The catcher in the rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Curriculum Standards Should Align College and Work Expectation

- ... Both institutions faired the same with written syllabus and guidelines to follow. Ultimately, they are both conscious of graduation rates for their institutions. How do teachers feel about the program. “Teachers have been given ownership of the curriculum and assessments and that has led to them buying into the framework. Overall, I would say that they find value in the process and the ownership that has been afforded to them” (Minnich). Campus Dean, Engle, noted that the faculty feels uneasy when building new curriculum, sharing built curriculum with adjunct faculty, and worried that with changes their position would become obsolete....   [tags: framework K thru 12, curriculum development]

Strong Essays
1932 words (5.5 pages)

Essay on The Catcher in the Rye Should Be Banned

- Catcher In The Rye was written in 1951 and for this time period, the book’s content was extremely ahead of its time. Its frequent foul language and sex-driven themes led it to be banned by several school systems across the country since its release. Some people may question why Salinger has Holden Caulfiend cursing so much. Some may see Caulfield’s persistent offensive language as unnecessary and unbecoming for a young person of Holden’s age. As an example, on page 129 when Caulfield is comparing his and Sally’s skating skills to the rest of the people at the ice-skating rink in Radio City....   [tags: J.D. Sallinger novel should be censored]

Strong Essays
802 words (2.3 pages)

Should Cameras be Included in Court Essay example

- According to Taranto, on the article Disorder in the Court, he builds a profound interest in the U.S Supreme Court which has on no occasion had a keen interest on the opinion of the oft-debated question of whether the oral arguments should be televised or videotaped. A vague aversion to the idea could have been acknowledgeable except it could have been impossible to articulate a clear argument to support it. The case that was being handled at the time was a minor case which could not have made it to the news headlines....   [tags: us supreme court, court tv, court disorder]

Strong Essays
1304 words (3.7 pages)

Palliative Care Concepts Should be Integrated into the Nursing Curriculum

- Nurse educators lay the groundwork when preparing to teach nursing classes. When considering curriculum development there are several things to keep in mind such as making the nursing classes as useful and interesting as possible, and also want ensuring that the information is inclusive of current standards of care, that is comprehendible for the learner. According to Billings and Halstead (2009) the design of curricula is to provide a sequence of learning experiences that enables the student learner to achieve educational outcomes and desires....   [tags: Nursing Curriculum, Palliative Care]

Strong Essays
1139 words (3.3 pages)

Essay on Use of Technology for Curriculum and Instruction

- ”Technology should not drive the curriculum; the curriculum should drive the technology,” says Angers (2004). One may ask what does this mean. Simply put, it means that the curriculum should dictate how technology will be used in the classroom. The purpose of this paper is to explain how to infuse technology into the curriculum, and the effect of technology on curriculum design. In order to add technology to the curriculum, technology must be available for use. To be available for use, the technology has to be placed in the classroom by someone – that someone usually being someone from Information Technology (IT)....   [tags: education, technology for curriculum]

Strong Essays
1630 words (4.7 pages)

Curriculum Review for Faith Development Essay

- While looking at different curriculums, there is a big importance of looking at the different methods of teaching students to grow faith development. To look at the effectiveness of the different curriculums when coming to teaching the grades from third through fifth grade I reviewed Concordia Publishing House’s “Growing in Christ- Middle Grades” compared to Faith Inkubator’s, “My Bible.” Looking at both of the curriculums, I used how they used the family, technology, and different ways of learning to show which was more effective in teaching students....   [tags: religion, Curriculum Review, education, ]

Strong Essays
909 words (2.6 pages)

Building and Implementing Curriculum Maps Essay examples

- Curriculum mapping within a professional learning community is a procedure for collecting and documenting what is taught in the classrooms. The focus on mapping is on units, content, skills, strategies, assessments, and resources that can be used to improve student learning and performance. According to Perkins interview with Jacobs, the key to curriculum mapping is that colleagues can share electronic data immediately so that everyone knows what is being taught in other classrooms today, last year, and in the future (2003)....   [tags: Curriculum Maps and PLCs]

Strong Essays
1215 words (3.5 pages)

Essay about Other Authors To Be Included in the Current Curriculum

- The twentieth century produced innumerable great and influential writers from all over the world. There are many that belong to the period studied, roughly from 1910s to the 1960s, who could arguably and justifiably be studied on the module alongside the masters of modernisms already on the syllabus - Kafka, Woolf, Joyce and Eliot. Authors such as Arthur Miller and his Death of a Salesman, F. Scott Fitzgerald with The Great Gatsby or Marcel Proust with his In Search for Lost Time have made it considerably difficult to single out Vladimir Nabokov as the author that I think should be studied on our module....   [tags: 20th Century Literature]

Strong Essays
2128 words (6.1 pages)

Curriculum Leadership Essay

- To define curriculum leadership, one should first have a working definition of curriculum. According to Marsh and Willis (2007), curriculum is usually regarded to mean a program of instruction at a school including both the planned and unplanned events in the classroom (pp.16, 375). Curriculum has three basic focal points: the nature of the individual, the nature society, and the nature of a subject (P. Brown, CIED 5053 lecture notes, August 28, 2006). Looking at these definitions, one could come up with several different meanings for curriculum leadership....   [tags: Curriculum ]

Strong Essays
1993 words (5.7 pages)

The Hisory of Curriculum Essays

- What exactly is curriculum. There are so many definitions, perceptions, beliefs, and historical explanations on curriculum, but how did it start. where did it come from. This paper will provide information on an array of intellectual knowledge concerning the history of curriculum, such as, what curriculum is and how it started, a few of the important education philosophers who had a great effect on the development of curriculum, the relationship history of culture and curriculum, and curriculum auditing....   [tags: Education, Curriculum, Informative]

Strong Essays
1577 words (4.5 pages)