The Case Of The Ferguson Police Department United States Department Of Justice Civil Rights

The Case Of The Ferguson Police Department United States Department Of Justice Civil Rights

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Jeffery, as plainly implied in an earlier statement I had made here ( re: "... protestors have an inalienable right to publicly remonstration through nonviolent demonstration and/or seek redress from their government ..."), I have no quarrel with any GOOD citizens that protests their government (local or otherwise), but when it unnecessarily and unrighteously turns into a riot by any such involved demonstrators (thugs) that harms innocent people (i.e., damage and destruction of public and private property, physical assaults, etcetera), then the line of social injustice and true criminality are clearly crossed.

Moreover, I don 't understand where or how you came to the erroneous assumption that I am uninformed or unaware of Ferguson 's local government 's serious flaws and systematic poor conduct. When it came available on the Internet several months ago, I had read the entire " Investigation of the Ferguson Police Department United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division - March 4, 2015" report which gives insight into Ferguson 's serious internal issues for which I strongly feel that any clear wrongdoing by any governmental entity be held accountable, and as soon as possible, fixed upon discovery. Also related to the Ferguson Police Department, this investigative report further stated that, "Notwithstanding our findings about Ferguson’s approach to law enforcement and the policing culture it creates, we found many Ferguson police officers and other City employees to be dedicated public servants striving each day to perform their duties lawfully and with respect for all members of the Ferguson community. The importance of their often-selfless work cannot be overstated." In essence, and typically the case that I h...


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...propriate civil action, but simply outright thuggery. Of course, if anyone thinks otherwise, perhaps they too are part of the problem and not part of the solution.

So, where 's the hypocrisy in my judgment and personal beliefs here? Outspoken I may be, and pretty much an open book, but many here in my Facebook circle that undoubtedly know me well, know that my words fit my actions. If they didn 't, I would have never successfully gotten where I am today professionally as a reputable law enforcement officer and military leader where trustworthiness, reliability, and integrity are paramount character traits that constantly challenged throughout most of my lifetime in dealing with life-and-death situations and adverse circumstances where many ordinary people will never experience such an on-going rigorous test of fire of their own personal ethics and character.

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