The Case Brown Vs. Board Of Education Essay

The Case Brown Vs. Board Of Education Essay

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Before World War II and the Cold War, federal support of public education was “limited” or non-existent. But after these two particular wars and with the launch of Sputnik, federal support of education, in general, expanded. A pivotal turning point in U.S. history and in public education is the famous Supreme Court case Brown vs. Board of Education of 1954. Federal involvement grew with the “desegregation requirements in the Brown vs. Board of Education provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964” (Provenzo, 2009. p. 340). This case not only brought awareness to the laws governed by our leaders, but also the politics behind our laws. And Brown vs. Board of Education was the beginning of a civil rights movement, and it also displayed the struggles Americans faced with racial equality.
Trichetta Chestnut, an advocate for the Black History Bulletin, had the chance to create an article entailing of all the important records during the case. To define exactly what the case of Brown vs. Board of Education entailed, it is explained that this case was first filed in February of 1951, by parents who had children that were denied admissions into the nearby public white schools in their neighborhood. Brown v. the Board of Education was finally appealed to the Supreme Court in 1954 after the District Court ruled against the parent’s complaints that the schools were not equal. (Chestnut. 2004. p. 9). Because there were so many parents filling suits addressing their child’s segregated school, cases from South Carolina, Delaware, Washington D.C. and Virginia were joined with Oliver Brown’s. According to Lenneal Henderson, a National Civic Review contributor, “All of these cases addressed the constitutionality of racial segregation in public scho...


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... of schools, many students such as Joseph Robinson, at the time would not have been given the opportunity to attend a university because they were simply, not white. If it wasn’t for the bravery Oliver Brown possessed to confront the Topeka Board of Education and state of their wrong-doings, then schools today would not be the same. Joseph Robinson ends his reflection with something that I believe we all should express and that is, “I only hope that as this perpetual fight to establish a true community continues; and I exhibit similar courage in affirming and securing the rights provided to me and all citizens of this great nation” (2004. p.34). Our country has come a long way from its normal traditions of oppressing the minority, even though it still exists today in some circumstances. We live in a country now that is always striving to create equality for everyone.

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The Case Brown Vs. Board Of Education Essay

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